Tag Archives: #WAM2019

#Hello from one young carer

On Day 16 of World Alzheimer’s Day #WAM2019 we highlight the story of one young care partner whose mother had young onset dementia.

It is important we are remember that children of a parent living with younger onset dementia are too often the invisible care partners and are not adequately recognised by health care providers, if at all.

An Australian researcher, Karen Hutchinson was researching the impact of dementia on young adults and children. Her work identified four common experiences of young people living with a parent with younger onset dementia, which included the emotional toll of caring, keeping the family together, grief and loss and psychological distress.

This is one young care partners story, first published in Karen’s research, then republished with permission in Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or another dementia: A practical guide to what’s next for people living with dementia, their families and care partners [1]

As an only child of a single parent X recalls seeing changes in his mum from about 8 years old. He lived in a small community where someone labeled his mum, at 42 years old, as a drug addict when they noticed some changes in her. Subsequently X was no longer able to have friends over to his house. He did not know what was happening to his mum, which he found hard as he could not explain to others what it was.

He was very protective of his mum and recalls how his friend pointed out to him when he was 11 that he was doing things that a parent normally did. Unknown to him he had started gradually to do things that his mum used to do. It was many years later before he knew her diagnosis of dementia.

When X was about 13 he hung with the ‘wrong crowd’ and did not attend school regularly. He was sleeping rough at nights to get away from home and drinking alcohol. He knew this was wrong but he needed to escape from his unpredictable home life. There were no boundaries placed on him so he was free to do whatever he wanted. His family and mum’s friends no longer visited so basically they were left alone.

They moved to a different area where X was soon labeled a ‘trouble-maker’ by the first school he attended. He then transferred to another school and it was there that finally a teacher took an interest in him but the fear of being separated from his mum made him stop disclosing what was happening at home. He recalls having some challenging times at school and felt he did not have much in common with his peers.

Thanks to a supportive teacher he remained at school until year 12 and this provided him with some ‘stability’ in his life. He did want to go to university but knew this was not going to happen and felt a real sadness about this. A supportive teacher helped him through this time and gave him hope for the future.

They faced financial hardship as there was no money for food and bills so he had to juggle school, paid work and caring for his mother. This eventually took its toll after leaving school where he ‘reached a crisis point’, he needed to escape and be like his friends free to leave home.

On reflection he felt he may have been depressed but his focus was on looking after his mum and felt there was no help for him except escape to the pub more frequently. He recalls the time when he finally asked for some help, a family member told him that it costs money and he wouldn’t be able to afford it, so he did not look into it further at this time.

His crisis worsened and he moved interstate as he wasn¹t coping but he organised his extended family to look after his mum before he left. He noted that very soon after his leaving community services were organised to support his mum. He felt lots of guilt but contacted and visited his mother frequently until he eventually returned home feeling stronger in himself to take over her care again. He felt no one could care for his mum as well as him because he loved her.

This complex and challenging situation continued whilst juggling paid work and his demanding caring role. Finally with the added benefit of maturity he realised that services and care for his mum was something they were entitled to and not just someone doing them a favour. With this new insight he felt more confident and empowered to get the help they needed. He now recognised himself as a carer and obtained financial support and gained legal advice with regards to managing his mum’s financial affairs. He recognised too that he needed a plan for the future. After many frustrating months navigating the complex process of arranging a suitable nursing home placement for his mother, he was successful. He reflected that ‘you shouldn’t have to jump through hoops to get it (services and residential care).

When his mum finally was accepted into a nursing home he remembers this time as a particularly emotional and difficult period where he felt he had failed her. He thought his life was spinning out of control but he knew it was time to be her son again. He was able to spend quality time with his mum without all the responsibilities and also finally start to sort out his own life.

‘I think having someone to talk to who knew about what was going on, would have made things better for me too. Because I just felt really alone. ‘Didn’t feel like I could talk to anyone about that stuff’ he reflected.

Stories in Karen’s research, and from DAI members reflect this is experienced by many young people in a similar situation to this young man.

You can also read the article by Karen Hutchinson, Chris Roberts and Susan Kurrle in the Australian Journal of Dementia Care, Invisible carers: Young People Caring for People With Dementia.

Please help us support more people with dementia to share their stories and live more positively by donating or partnering with Dementia Alliance International.

 

[1] Swaffer, K & Low, LF. (2016). “Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or another dementia: A practical guide for what’s next for people with dementia, their families and care partners”, New Holland Publishers: Sydney, pp 253-254.

 

 

#Hello, my name is Tomofumi Tanno

Tomofumi Tanno says hello, all the way from Japan, but via a presentation he made in ADI Chicago last year!

Tomo is a remarkable dementia advocate living in Japan, and last year, with the support of Kumiko Magome, who translated for him on this occasion, Tomo talked about what it has been like, being diagnosed with younger onset dementia at the age of 39.

Please help us support more people with dementia to share their stories and live more positively by donating or partnering with Dementia Alliance International.

#Hello, my name is Valerie Schache

Special thanks to DAI member, Valerie Schache for saying #Hello today, the continuing blog series we are publishing for Dementia Awareness Month/World Alzheimers Month. #WAM2019

Image source: Valerie Schache

Hello my name is Valerie Schache (Val). I’m 67 and I live near Ballina NSW Australia. I have dementia and I continue as the long term care partner for my husband with complex needs since 2004 . I was diagnosed August 2015 when I was 63. I was not supported, just given a dementia drug and ‘bye’. I’m still not tagged; I don’t fit the requirements for NeuRa Frontier etc and am left to my own devices to find a way through the minefield of deficits.

My paid skills were as acupuncturist physiotherapist including complex pain in de-mentia aged care. I’m also a life time farmer. I thank my country upbringing and wise parents who included me in ‘Why is this so’ type of discoveries. I have massive cognitive reserves to cope with the diverse defi-cits says my neuropsychologist assessors. We pioneered in farming and I in allied health and I now pioneer best health practices in the dementia space. 

I Thank God for DAI [Dementia Alliance International]. I was unravelling – not supported – not being believed; stigmatized and isolated to near oblivion and self harm.

My first DAI zoom in 2016, with a mob of diverse people globally with dementia—I laughed for the first time post diagnosis as I participated; I didn’t have to pretend in this group. I was encouraged to seek the latest ideas and I improved cognitively with the Bredesen type protocol. I then got angry that the ‘establishment’ weren’t right, that nothing could change a dementia journey. I became motivated enough to give back and educate for inclusion of my dementia disability—my human right; for suitable rehabilitation to keep me well and kindness. I have pre-sented globally nationally and now locally. Facebook has been my ‘work’ pre-dementia so I now also have an active group ‘Val’s journey –dementia is a word not a sentence’ and comment often on other sites. I am gifted at reading research papers and gleaning the nuggets of change for the better from diverse sources. 

Advantages of dementia: yes, there are some.

I’ve found who my handful of friends really are. My personality type changing deficits means I’m now stronger minded. opinionated; my language is colorful, pithy and sometimes to the point. My ‘bull-shit’ meter is accentuated and I certainly won’t be patronised or treated as less because I have a neurodegenerative disease. I tackle things from the front foot.

Yes I can only now do one thing at a time– but then so do most men. Passionate, fearless bold as a hyena I help tackle issues especially if injustice is involved. I can still read a scientific paper of any genre and give you back six points in plain speak to any audience. My considerable savant knowledge is exposed and I’m well read. 

Disadvantages of dementia: yes!

In my ‘bestment’s’ words ‘It’s a pain in the ‘butt’ —I want my old Val back’ – it wont happen this side of eternity but I’m committed to her and we support each other and its ongoing. We are a great team. I struggle to be OK with the flamboyant new me. I have constant grief as I have brain ‘rat gnaws’ and I wonder what’s gone this time and can I get around it!

I hate having disturbed bodily functions; to always be reminded to remember what I need to take especially if I am distracted. I hate needing to pace myself, and accepting increasing support from others.

To be told ‘you don’t look like you have dementia’ – deep breathe Val– that is such an insulting reflex comment—one you would not say to someone with diabetes etc.

I have a DNR bracelet and all our legal affairs are in order so I don’t have to think about that part of the future except with joy at going home. 

I know dementia’s for over fifty years, observation and then worked as an acupuncturist physio for 32 yrs; a decade in a locked dementia ward and since 2005 have supported dozens of friends to die with dementia. But I say dementia should be rare—not an epidemic. 

What’s changed since the 1950’s?

Lets consider plastics, diesel fumes, atomic bombs, margarines and cholesterol issues/reduction and less sleep /increased stress and now obesity. It’s onset can be slowed even preventable with diet, BP/ Weight control. I say ‘If great grandma wont recognize it , its not food’ e.g. margarines. Hundreds of us in dozens of countries are creating a quiet revolution of change- confounding the ‘experts’ by reversing /slowing dementia– bringing hope to those able to follow a personalized precise protocol.

Back to basics of having health gut biomes for a healthy brain. Removing allergens including foods and environmental toxins especially mold. Team Val use hair analysis blood tests supplements and other hands on best practice to improve me holistically. Being mindful, stress controlled, sleeping soundly, very kind to yourself and at peace with those around you. Live in the moment as it is your pre-sent. I have hope, I have significantly improved in many markers since 2015 and I have dementia. 

Final words…

Its not the future I would have chosen, but we are making the best of this deal and giving back . We laugh and love freely. I aim to ease the life of all the other thousands pre and post dementia diagnosed. I’ve always smashed ‘glass ceilings’ so I’m breaking down the myths /assumptions about de-mentia, boldly and in every avenue presented to, or created by me. 

Don’t be like dementia, it doesn’t discriminate, it is a disability, and it is unkind. Be aware not to discriminate, be inclusive and be especially kind to all, and do everything to slow or prevent the onset of dementia for your own sake. 

Valerie Schache © 2019

Please help us support more people with dementia to share their stories and live more positively by donating or partnering with Dementia Alliance International.

#Hello, my name is Emily Ong

Wow, it is already Day 9 of Dementia Awareness Month / World Alzheimer’s Month #WAM2019!

Unlike 2018, we are taking the weekends off, so this series is an ‘almost’ daily one!

Today,  we are privileged to share Emily Ong’s story, one of our newer members who lives in Singapore.  Thank you Emily, we greatly appreciate you sharing your very story of being diagnosed with dementia, therefore your personal vulnerability with us all. Many people with dementia  find that by sharing with others, they find strength, and give others hope.

Image source: Emily Ong

Hello, my name is Emily Ong

June 2017 (the exact date I could not remember already) I have the most scariest experience of my life when I asked myself -“What do I need to make French toast?” – when it has always been my family usual breakfast. All that I remembered was bread and the equipment I need was a skillet.

I tried so hard to recall but NOTHING was retrieved.

It was like my brain has a virus attack and the French toast file has been corrupted. The “French Toast” episode marked the beginning of my “new” life that I am gradually learning to understand and manage.

By April 2018, I have done 3 Montreal Cognitive Assessments and the last score was 17/30, numerous MRI scans and one lumbar puncture were done but nothing conclusive, and one FDG-PET scan that showed significantly lower uptake of glucose in the thalamus and the cerebellum region. During this period I was misdiagnosed as having Fatal Familiar Insomnia, a type of Prion disease, and subsequently, as a psychiatric problem (depression?), and then as Alzheimer’s disease.

Each diagnosis brought along so much misery and emotional impact on me and my family. Life was emotionally unbearable, and I cried almost every other day!

I could not stop asking myself, “What’s wrong with me? Am I going crazy? Were my problems real?

At the age of 51, I was finally diagnosed with provisional fronto-temporal dementia. It was a great relief to know that my mind is sound, certainly not having a mental illness but a neurocognitive disorder.

It is a comforting and wonderful feeling to know that your doctor finally heard you and your struggles, rather than generalised your symptoms as mood swings, anxiety disorders and even depression. Though further tests are necessary to confirm which variants, I feel empowered because I can now move on and develop a support plan that include joining support groups to assist me functioning at my optimal level on a daily basis.

Early intervention is something very dear to my heart because that has always been my life mission in my work with special needs. Ever since then I have joined the Alzheimer’s Disease Association (ADA), Singapore and Dementia Alliance International (DAI).

I also set up a personal blog to raise awareness through sharing my journey with dementia and things I learnt about the neurocognitive disorders; participate in two research projects under the National Neuro Institute, Singapore; and going to undergo training to become self-advocate for YOD under “Voices for Hopes” program.

Without the support from my family and the new communities where I find solace in, it is rather unlikely that I can be so emotionally strong and positive as I am now.

My new friends taught me that there’s still life after the diagnosis because life can still be purposeful and beautiful with dementia.

Emily Ong  © 2019

Please help us support more people with dementia to share their stories and live more positively by donating or partnering with Dementia Alliance International.

#Hello, my name is Juanita Hughes

On day 4 of World Alzheimer’s Month, #DAI member Juanita Hughes, from Brisbane says #Hello.

These stories highlight the many different experiences people have in terms of getting a  diagnosis, and how they choose to live with and respond to what is a very difficult diagnosis to be given.  Thank you Juanita for sharing your story.

I am 54 and I have young onset early stage behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD)

Image source: Juanita Hughes

I have a strong family history of what we now know is bvFTD. My grandfather was quite some time along the dementia track, and he was misdiagnosed as having Alzheimer’s, even though, in retrospect, he had shown classic symptoms of bvFTD.

An older brother also had the same condition and we believe their father also had dementia, and may be others in his heritage.

My father has lost his sister and two younger brothers, and has another younger brother undergoing testing for this condition. After dad’s younger brother died his daughter a nurse started serious research into the condition and discovered the research group Frontier, located then at the University of New South Wales research group – Neura, which specialised in frontotemporal dementia research.

They were keen to have my father joined them as a research participant in their main research project and threw them he was diagnosed as having bvFTD and the genetic mutation involved was discovered – C9orf72. My sister and I indicated that when they started research that was applicable to us we were willing to join.

I have a background in science research, so once this was discovered I read all the scientific literature that about this condition and this mutation that I could put my hands on. This included the current diagnostic criteria for bvFTD. As soon as possible I had myself tested for the mutation and received a positive result – I had the mutation too.

This had been two years since my dad’s initial diagnosis due to delays within the free State Government sponsored testing system. The genetic counsellor told me that she could not tell me much about my prognosis except that it was not case of if but when I would get the disease. This result didn’t actually surprise me as I was already aware of minor changes consistent with the diagnostic criteria.

Within a few months of my genetic result, I had convinced my GP to refer me to a neurologist for testing. My initial neurologist was convinced that I probably had dementia, but he specialised in movement disorders rather than dementia so he referred me onto his colleague who runs a clinic in atypical dementias.

So about seven months after the genetic diagnosis I received a diagnosis of dementia – definite bvFTD with the early signs and known genetic mutation leading to bvFTD. The neurologist told me that I was extremely early in the dementia journey, and that he had never diagnosed anybody this early. Then wanted to put me onto pharmaceutical interventions which I adamantly refused.

A few months before getting my genetic diagnosis, Frontier in was able to obtain funding to run a longitudinal study to endeavour to identify early changes in biomarkers/scan data for Dominantly Inherited Non-Alzheimer’s Dementias – DINAD. My sister and I and my cousin all became participants in this research. The genetic counsellor of this research was pleasantly surprised at my knowledge of the disease and suggested I become a genetic counsellor myself. So this year I have commenced studying Master of Diagnostic Genomics, with a plan to continue into a PhD program.

Once I had my diagnosis I was no longer eligible for the DINAD program, and volunteered to join the same research program that my father was in. I went into my first assessment with this program only to find that not only had they placed me in the research program I thought I was joining, but many other researchers wanted me to join their projects as well – so many that I lost count. Because I am so much earlier in my dementia journey than the standard research participant I can give a different perspective to the research so they are all keen to have me participate.

I would like to repeat here part of posts (edited) I put on the Facebook page – Living Healthy with Early Onset Dementia – on August 22nd.

Saying this may sound crazy, but I’m grateful for the genetic mutation underlying my dementia … I have heard too many stories of the difficulty people have in getting an accurate diagnosis or any diagnosis at all, and my heart goes out to you all.

I am glad that I have this diagnosis while I am still able to describe what it feels like to be on this side of dementia as researchers characteristically state that people with bvFTD lose the capacity to assess their own changes early in the disease process. I can see this with my dad who is in late mid stages of the same disease. He variously denies any problems or says he’s getting better, whereas my mum and I can see his degeneration.

The downside of this is that researchers don’t bother to ask people with a lived experience and just rely on carers and clinicians observations to describe the characteristic diagnostic conditions. I am in the unique position to describe this lived experience, as most people with this dementia are diagnosed too late, or haven’t read the scientific literature to know what erroneous conclusions to challenge.

…Within a few days of my diagnosis I had applied to join Dementia Alliance International and attended my first support meeting within two weeks of the diagnosis. I have now joined their action team. I have become an advocate with Dementia Australia and applied to join the Dementia Australia Advisory Committee.

When I joined as an advocate with Dementia Australia, I agreed to become part of a focus group. The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care asked Dementia Australia to assist with rewriting a Cognitive Impairment Fact Sheet to be used in healthcare settings. I volunteered to help in a focus group in my hometown but before that happened I had to come down to Sydney and was invited to join the Sydney group.

As a result of participating in this project I’ve been asked and agreed to three more. The next week I talked with a researcher from a group that has been commissioned to do research on behalf of the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety. Late in August I agreed to be filmed as part of a video to be released Dementia Australia Action week.

In a few days’ time I will be involved as a panel member representing those with a lived experience of dementia in the Decoding Dementia Mentoring Workshop which is assessing new technological innovations to help people living with dementia. In October, I will be speaking publicly about dementia for the first time. Dementia Awareness and Advocacy Team is a group that I joined in my local city, and I am speaking at their annual one-day forum.

These posts well describe my feelings and emphasises my motto:

Dementia Is a Journey – Not a Destination.

Please help us support more people with dementia to share their stories and live more positively by donating or partnering with Dementia Alliance International.

#Hello, my name is John Sandblom

Welcome to World Alzheimer’s Month #WAM2019.  As we did in 2018, we aim to highlight the voices of our members, and this year, our families. The voices of everyone impacted by dementia matter, and today, we kick off #WAM2019 with co-founder John Sandbloms story of being diagnosed with dementia in 2007.

Johns personal story of being diagnosed with dementia was first published on his website, and is re-published here with permission. You can read his blogs here…

Early (Young) Onset Atypical Alzheimer’s Disease – one person’s story.

John Sandblom, USA

My name is John Sandblom and I am diagnosed with Young Onset Atypical Alzheimer’s Disease. I was first diagnosed at the age of 48 in 2007 with FTD by a gerontologist that specialized in dementia. He was the same physician that diagnosed my father with Alzheimer’s Disease in his early 70’s. My mother had been saying that my father was “losing it” for many years but I never really understood what she meant and if she was just complaining about normal aging issues with my father. I knew that he had made some very ill advised decisions in his late 40’s, 50’s and 60’s but I once again NEVER thought about the possibility of dementia nor did he ever admit that there was anything wrong with his brain or thinking.

My mother passed away from lung cancer and it was at that time we realized my father had some serious problems with thinking. We moved him in to a retirement community apartment and he managed on his own for a few years. He then began exhibiting serious problems with memory and behavior and it was no longer safe to allow him to drive according to his doctor. I was the only child that lived in the same city so I moved him in with me and we took away his car. This was met with extreme anger but we understood it was the disease and the fact that he never admitted or understood what was happening with him.

I suspect that he had effects from the disease as young as I did but he was self employed so when he made bad decisions it led to one business going under and him starting a new one. His bad decisions all make sense to me now because he had been an extremely successful businessman in his earlier years.After a couple of years living with me it was no longer safe to leave him home alone because he had nearly caught the house on fire and had flooded an upstairs bathroom because he forgot he left the water running. We got him placed in what was considered the best memory care unit in the area.

Fast forward to October of 2007. I had been on short term disability from work labeled with depression (I knew I wasn’t depressed but also knew something was wrong so whatever allowed me to be off work was OK) when my wife went against advice from others and called the physician’s office that had diagnosed my father. I went through many scans including a PET scan and neuropsych tests. The physician decided I had FTD. I was put on long term disability and applied for Social Security Disability. After an appeal the Social Security Disability was approved.

My wife and I started going to a support group that is provided by The Alzheimer’s Association, an organization I highly recommend for anyone with any type of dementia and their caregivers.  At this point I took that doctor’s word that I had FTD. After a little over a year I began to ask questions that he didn’t have answers for because I was not progressing as he expected. He became angry with me and I left his office that day thinking no one should EVER be treated that way by a health care provider. I had asked a friend I had made through the FTD Support Forum about getting in to see her doctor at Mayo Clinic in Rochester MN whose name is Dr. Bradley Boeve and is world renown in the dementia field.

He is a cognitive neurologist specializing in dementia which is what I highly encourage anyone that wants to be evaluated to seek out. I got an appointment with Dr Boeve but it would be 5 months before I could make it to Rochester, MN for a week that worked with my wife’s schedule and his schedule. He is the chair of his department and has substantial amounts of his schedule blocked out for research and teaching. He started from scratch and put me through an unbelievable amount of tests assuming nothing. They even repeated my PET scan.

By Thursday of that week he met with me and told me it was medically undeniable that I had a neurodegeneratve brain disease (dementia) but the question was which one? My scans did not match up to anything they normally see as the majority of the damage at that point was in an area described to me like a junction box for all the things the brain does and where executive function is controlled. This explained why I seemed fairly normal but could no longer be successful at work and had problems with things like time management. I could no longer multitask very well at all. But when most of your problems are all about executive function most people think there is nothing wrong with you. In my case I knew something was horribly wrong.

This was never in question for me. In fact, a couple of years before I was ever diagnosed I had an episode that I still can’t really explain but I got scared that I had Alzheimer’s Disease so I told my family doctor that which was met with “don’t be silly, you don’t have Alzheimer’s Disease”. It really wasn’t his fault, most people wouldn’t have had that thought in the first place let alone suggest it to their doctor at age 46. And it highlights a very big problem in healthcare today, training general practice, family practice, psychiatrists and internal medicine doctors on when to refer to a cognitive neurologist for evaluation of early onset dementia. Dr. Boeve told me it is his experience that a patient is usually correct. So if someone tells their doctor that dementia is a fear they should always be evaluated properly.

A while before I went to Mayo Clinic I met a local cognitive neurologist that specialized in dementia and was fairly new to the area.  She seemed like a very good person and a very knowledgeable doctor so I made an appointment with her. She held off doing any tests because she knew Mayo would want to do a lot of their own. Her name is Heike Schmolck, M.D. and I highly recommend her to anyone in Central Iowa who needs a specialist in dementia. After the findings at Mayo she agreed with those and felt like it was most likely that I had atypical FTD.

So I lived with that idea until early November of 2011. My father had passed away from complications from his dementia in the spring of 2010. I immediately contacted NCRAD about donating his brain for research. I was told at the time that I would never gain any knowledge from this donation, that it’s only purpose was for research which I want to support in every way I can so that hopefully my children and grandchildren will not have a chance of the same fate. Dr. Boeve had told me and my local doctor agreed that I had the same thing my father had suffered from and that there most likely is a genetic connection meaning any of my offspring would face a 50/50 chance of getting the disease themselves. In early November of 2011 I received the full autopsy report on my father’s brain. To my shock and the shock of my neurologist it showed he had Alzheimer’s Disease. That led to changing my diagnosis to Early Onset Atypical Alzheimer’s Disease (frontal variant). 

It is very scary for anyone with dementia to think about the distant future. To think about that is to admit what we will be reduced to and how hard it will be on those that love us. So I chose to concentrate on what I can still do to feel useful and feel like I am giving back in some way. I do volunteer work for my local chapter of The Alzheimer’s Association. I have been to the National Forum in Washington D.C. three years in a row (2010,2011 & 2012) to visit with our congressional representatives about issues important to those that suffer from dementia. I feel it is my obligation to do whatever I can while I still can to help all those that suffer and in memory of those that have suffered like my father. I stay very upbeat and not above making a joke about my condition on a regular basis.

I don’t take it lightly but like someone once said, in situations like this you can laugh or cry and I prefer to laugh.

Whether you are new to dementia or this is not a new subject for you, I highly recommend The Alzheimer’s Association for resources in your area and a lot more. When you go to the national website that is linked, you will find in the upper right hand corner there is a place where you can enter your zip code to find out where your nearest chapter is located. These people are always happy to meet with you or talk on the phone and help in any way they can! The association is also the largest private source of research funds for dementia in the world. If you can afford it, please donate to them! I also encourage anyone with dementia to contact NCRAD to see how you can help further research. I donated blood along with donating my father’s brain. 

Are you or someone you know diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or a related disease? Would you like support from others that are  diagnosed? If so direct them to http://www.dementiaallianceinternational.org/membership/  to sign up for FREE membership and many support options.