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Media Release

November 28/29, 2018

Dementia Australia and Dementia Alliance International to globally champion rights of people living with dementia. Dementia Australia has formalised its relationship with Dementia Alliance International and today signed a new memorandum of understanding (MOU).

Dementia Australia CEO, Maree McCabe said the MOU recognises both organisations are aligned in their purpose to promote awareness and understanding of dementia and to advocate for the autonomy, independence and human rights of people living with dementia.

“We share a commitment and vision for a world where people living with dementia are valued, included and receive the care and support they choose,” Ms McCabe said.

Dementia Alliance International Chair, CEO and Co-founder, Kate Swaffer said the organisations would advocate together to expand the awareness and understanding of dementia across the aged care, disability and health care sectors in Australia and on the world stage.

“Together we will liaise on global dementia policy issues, to ensure our policies and programs are aligned to the WHO Global Dementia Action Plan” Ms Swaffer said.

Dementia Alliance International is the peak organisation with membership exclusively for people with a medically confirmed diagnosis of any type of dementia from all around the world.

“As the global voice of dementia, Dementia Alliance International provides a platform for the many people living with dementia who are capable of representing themselves, or speaking up for those who are no longer able to,” Ms Swaffer said.

“We have members in 48 countries, and self-advocacy is becoming a strong focus, where we work with members of Alzheimer’s Disease International, such as Dementia Australia, to empower others to have a voice.”

Worldwide it is estimated there are 50 million people living with dementia. This number will almost double every 20 years, reaching 131.5 million in 2050.

“According to Alzheimer’s Disease International research, someone in the world develops dementia every three seconds,” Ms Swaffer said.

Dementia Australia is the national peak body and charity for people of all ages, living with all forms of dementia, their families and carers. Dementia Alliance International is the global peak body representing people with dementia.

“Dementia Australia is the first national dementia association to partner with us, and DAI is very proud to be more formally working with them,”Ms Swaffer said.

“It is a natural fit for the two peak bodies to work together to promote awareness and understanding of dementia,” Ms McCabe said.

For further information visit the Dementia Australia website at www.dementia.org.au or Dementia Alliance International at https://www.infodai.org.

Dementia Australia is the national peak body and charity for people, of all ages, living with all forms of dementia, their families and care partners. It provides advocacy, support services, education and information. An estimated 436,000 people have dementia in Australia. This number is projected to reach almost 1.1 million by 2058. Dementia Australia’s services are supported by the Australian Government. www.dementia.org.au

Dementia Alliance International(DAI) is a collaboration of individuals diagnosed with dementia providing a unified voice of strength, advocacy, and support in the fight for individual autonomy for people with dementia. The aim is to bring the community composed of those with dementia together as one strong voice to urge the government, private sector, and medical professionals to listen to our concerns and take action to address this urgent global crisis. It is our firm belief that working together, we will identify concrete action for implementation with the international community, and in the process, ensure our human rights are being fully met. DAI is a registered charity in the USA, and the global voice of dementiahttps://www.infodai.org

Dementia is a Global and National Health Priority Area 

Media contacts: Louise Handran [email protected] +61 490 128 304 / Kate Swaffer [email protected]

When talking or writing about dementia please refer to Dementia Language Guidelines.

Image: Ms Maree McCabe, CEO, Dementia Australia and Ms Kate Swaffer, CEO, Dementia Alliance International, signing the Memorandum Of Understanding (MOU)

 

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DAI Media Release

The human rights of people living with dementia: from Rhetoric to Reality

Dementia Alliance International is proud to be launching its first official publication to coincide with the adoption by Alzheimer’s Disease International of a Human Right based approach, and to coincide with Dementia Awareness Week UK 2016. With input from our Human Rights Advisor Professor Peter Mittler, and other experts, we hope this guide will educate and support the activities of individuals and organisations, and will be the beginning of real change.  We have had much rhetoric and agreement that we have human rights; now we want real action.

Media Release:

There are currently more than 47 million people with dementia globally and one new diagnosis every 3.2 seconds[i]. There are 850,000 people in the UK who have a form of dementia[ii], more than 5 million[iii] in America, and more than 353,800[iv] Australians with dementia in Australia.  If dementia were a country, it would be the 18th largest economy.

Dementia Alliance International (DAI) is an advocacy group, the peak body and global voice of people with dementia. Our mission includes Human Rights based approaches that are applied to the pre and post-diagnostic experiences of people with a dementia, in every way. We advocate for a more ethical pathway of support that includes our human right to full rehabilitation and full inclusion in civil society; “nothing about us, without us.”

“We are launching this landmark Dementia Alliance International guide because, as a direct result of DAI’s advocacy and a rights-based approach including access to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) has just been adopted by Alzheimer’s Disease International. This is a watershed moment for people with dementia across the world.”  Kate Swaffer

The human rights of people with dementia lie at the heart of our work. Access to the UN Disability Convention was one of the demands made by DAI’s Chair, Kate Swaffer at the World Health Organisation’s First Ministerial Conference on Dementia held in Geneva in March 2015. Since then, we have done everything we can to make a reality of that demand.

“What matters to us now is that people living with dementia should be empowered to use their undisputed right of access to this and to other relevant UN Human Rights Conventions, including a future Convention on the Rights of Older Persons.” Professor Peter Mittler

You can download a copy of our publication here: Human Rights for People Living with Dementia – Rhetoric to Reality

You can view a video of Kate Swaffer and Peter Mittler introducing the need for a human rights based approach to dementia at the recent ADI Conference in Budapest here:

Membership of DAI is exclusive to people with a medically confirmed diagnosis of dementia; to join our exclusive club or to join a support group, visit us here www.joindai.org.

Contact details

Contact Kate Swaffer for more information or read more about the work of Dementia Alliance International here.

Follow us on @DementiaAlliance

Kate Swaffer, Chair, CEO, Co-founder of Dementia Alliance International and author of What the hell happened to my brain?: Living beyond dementia, published on January 21, 2016.

References

[i] World Health Organisation, Dementia Statistics (2015) http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2015/action-on-dementia/en/

[ii] Alzheimer’s Association, (2016). 2016 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures. http://www.alz.org/facts/overview.asp

[iii] Alzheimer’s Society UK (2014). Dementia 2014 report statistics, https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/statistics

[iv] Alzheimer’s Australia (2016) Key Statistics, https://fightdementia.org.au/about-dementia/statistics