Tag Archives: IDA

Discrimination Campaign – COVID19 #WHA73

The International Disability Alliance and the International Disability and Development Consortium have launched a Covid19 Discrimination campaign to call to raise awareness of examples of the discrimination that persons with disabilities experience in accessing services and call on the global community on the critical and urgent need to deliver disability inclusive COVID-19 responses at global, national and local levels.

The issue:

The one billion persons with disabilities are one of the most excluded groups in our society. The World Health Organisation and various other UN agencies are reporting that people with disabilities are being disproportionately affected by COVID-19.

The issue of discrimination is particularly pressing. Evidence suggests that persons with disabilities are among the hardest hit during the COVID-19 pandemic. Dangerous narratives have been emerging that people with disabilities cannot contribute to the response to COVID-19, make their own decisions and most worryingly, that their lives are not considered as worth saving compared to others – in direct contradiction of the UNCRPD and all other human rights instruments.

The Aim:

The campaign will raise awareness of examples of the discrimination that persons with disabilities experience in accessing services (such as health services) during the global pandemic. It will call on the global community on the critical and urgent need to deliver disability inclusive COVID-19 responses at global, national and local levels.

This phase of the campaign will launch to coincide with the World Health Assembly. The public facing elements of the campaign will support the advocacy statement given to the World Health Assembly. The campaign will use the World Health Assembly to highlight the particular barriers persons with disabilities experience accessing health services and why the need to act is so critical and urgent.

Key Campaign Messages:

  • People with disabilities are being disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Information is not being made available in accessible formats, so persons with disabilities are denied their right to make informed decisions.
  • Negative attitudes mean persons with disabilities are often considered less of a priority to receive critical health care, or their lives seen as worth less than the lives of persons without disabilities.
  • Social distancing may be particularly challenging for persons with disabilities who require support with personal care.

Persons with disabilities are also more likely to live in institutional settings, which have been shown to be an environment where the COVID-19 virus is exacerbated.

Physical buildings (including health facilities, and testing and quarantine centers) are often inaccessible, and reasonable accommodations like interpreters are often not available.
In many situation, COVID-19 health responses have hindered access to other health services for persons with disabilities. Often, these health services are important and lifesaving, such as rehabilitation services and medicine for people with epilepsy.

Women and girls with disabilities face additional barriers to accessing sexual and reproductive health and rights.

World Health Assembly Statement

The Seventy-third of the World Health Assembly will take place in Geneva, Switzerland from 17 – 21 May 2020. The WHA is attended by delegations from all WHO Member States and focuses on a specific health agenda prepared by the Executive Board.
The International Disability Alliance (IDA) and International Disability and Development Consortium (IDDC) members have submitted written statements to be considered under provisional agenda item 3 Address by WHO Director-General devoted to the COVID-19 pandemic response in advance of the opening of the Health Assembly.

Access the official statements here.

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Dementia Alliance International, a an organiszation representing the more than 52 million people with dementia, who are all people with acquited disabilities, thanks IDA and IDDC for their continued advocacy to realise the disability rights for us all.

Civil Society Forum – Day 2 update

In June I was representing DAI in New York attending day 2 of the pre conference Civil Society Forum , followed by the 11th Session of the Conference Of State Parties (COSP) on the Convention of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

I apologise for a late report on it; and there are more to come! Clearly, there are not enough hours in each day, or days in each week!

The Overarching Theme this year of the 11th COSP was “Leaving no one behind through the full implementation of the CRPD”, with the following Subthemes and Crosscutting themes.

Sub-themes:

1. National fiscal space, public-private partnerships and international cooperation for strengthening the implementation of the CRPD
2. Women and girls with disabilities
3. Political participation and equal recognition before the law

Cross-cutting theme:

Promoting high-quality disability statistics and disaggregation of data by disability status for the full realization of the rights of persons with disabilities.

It was very pleasing to be given the opportunity to make various statements, the first one on Day 2 of the Civil Society Forum, the pre COSP event which I was only able to attend on the second day. It was an opportunity to ensure dementia was not forgotten as a condition causing acquired, and progressive cognitive disabilities.

My first statement, not pre-planned, but made in the discussion time after the main speakers in the aftrenoon of Day 2 of the Civil Society  Forum on June 11, 2018 is listed below.

Statement 1 – Day 2 of the Civil Society Forum in New York, preceding the COSP.

My name is Kate Swaffer, a co founder and the current Chair and CEO of Dementia Alliance International. I’d first like to thank Klaus Lachwitz from the International Disability Alliance for mentioning dementia in his earlier comment, which was the first time this condition has made it into the discussions today.

I represent the 50 million people currently living with dementia, and am also one of them. The WHO states there is a new diagnosis of dementia every 3 seconds, and whilst dementia is a chronic, progressive terminal condition, it is also the leading cause of death and disability in older persons.

Yet most people in civil society do not yet see this condition as one that brings with it acquired cognitive disabilities, and I ask that we consider this today, to ensure that no one is left behind.

Dementia disproportionality impacts women and girls; more women are diagnosed with dementia, and women and girls make up more than two thirds of unpaid carers, and more than 70% are women and girls in Low and Middle Income Countries.

People with dementia are systematically excluded from rights based and equitable inclusion; the barriers are far more than dementia.

The real barriers are due to stigma, discrimination and the misperceptions about the capacity of people with dementia, and the many breaches of our most basic of human rights.

Inclusion continues to be a ‘tick box’ experience for many of us, and very often, self-advocacy requires significant self-funding, simply to ensure our rights under Articles 4.3 and 33.3, of which discussions have been exclusively focused on today.

We therefore ask for not only inclusion, but for appropriate funding from governments and NGO’s or DPO’s to ensure full and equal inclusion and participation of this cohort, to enable it. As many have speakers have stated today, this is undoubtedly our right.

Thank you.

Kate Swaffer
Chair, CEO & Co-founder
Dementia Alliance International