Tag Archives: discrimination

World Health Day 2021

World Health Organisation – World Health Day 2021

On April 7 each year, DAI joins the world in observing World Health Day. The theme in 2021 is Building a fairer, healthier world.

We must end discrimination and exclusion.

As COVID-19 has highlighted, some people live healthier lives with better access to health services than other people. These differences are entirely due to the conditions in which they are born, grow, live, work, and age. However, they can also be due to stigma, discrimination, economic status, and other factors such as disability or a disease, such as dementia.

All over the world, people struggle financially, which the pandemic has exacerbated. Some groups struggle with little or no daily income, inadequate housing conditions, poor educational and employment opportunities, gender inequality, age and disability discrimination. They also have little to no access to clean water and air, nutritious food, or health services.

This harms our societies and economies, leading to unnecessary distress, avoidable illnesses, and premature death.

DAI represents the more than 50 million people currently living with dementia. Nearly 60% live in low and middle income countries.

COVID-19 has affected all countries hard, but its impact has been harshest on those communities that were already vulnerable, especially people living with dementia and other disabilities.

Everyone impacted by dementia receives little if any health care. This includes lack of diagnostic support and inadequate support for living with dementia once diagnosed, with interventions such as rehabilitation.

From increased isolation to systemic human and disability rights violations, people with dementia have disproportionately experienced the adverse effects of measures implemented to contain the pandemic.

This is where DAI comes in…

During the pandemic, DAI increased the number of freely available services for people living with dementia by providing even more free, online support groups and other activities for our members in 49 countries. DAI has also continued our global efforts on claiming the human and disability rights for all people with dementia through our international advocacy and policy work.

In recognition of World Health Day, Dementia Alliance International commits to continuing to build a fairer, healthier world.

We will continue to call on leaders to monitor inequalities experienced by people with dementia and our families, and will work towards ensuring that all are able to access quality health services.

As a registered non-profit charity, we rely on the support of people like you. Your donation will help us to provide free online peer to peer support groups for people living with dementia, virtual cafes, and educational webinars, as well as other opportunities for families, care partners, and the wider dementia community.

DAI’s vision is a world where all people are valued and included.

If you do too, please consider becoming a regular supporter of Dementia Alliance International.

Every dollar makes a difference in the life of someone living with a diagnosis of dementia!

We are appealing to you to donate to DAI today.

Thank you.

 

Human Rights and the Confinement of People Living with Dementia in Care Homes

Todays blog is an important Human Rights Law Journal article, Human Rights and the Confinement of People Living with Dementia in Care Homes published on 18 June 2020.

By Linda Steele, Ray Carr, Kate Swaffer, Lyn Phillipson, and Richard Fleming.

Abstract: This paper responds to growing concerns in human rights practice and scholarship about the confinement of people living with dementia in care homes. Moving beyond the existing focus in human rights scholarship on the role of restrictive practices in confinement, the paper broadens and nuances our understanding of confinement by exploring the daily facilitators of confinement in the lives of people with dementia. The paper draws on data from focus groups and interviews with people living with dementia, care partners, aged care workers, and lawyers and advocates about Australian care homes. It argues that microlevel interrelated and compounding factors contribute to human rights abuses of people living with dementia related to limits on freedom of movement and community access of people living with dementia, at times irrespective of the use of restrictive practices. These factors include immobilization and neglect of residents, limited and segregated recreational activities, concerns about duty of care and liability, apprehension of community exclusion, and pathologization and subversion of resistance. It is necessary to challenge the organizational, cultural, economic, and social dynamics that shape day-to-day, microlevel, routine, and compounding factors that remove the agency of people living with dementia and in turn facilitate entrenched and systematic human rights breaches in care homes.

You can download the full article here…

This article is one of three, as part of a research project many members of DAI were involved in as participants of the research, and at the Summit. The project ‚ÄėSafe and Just Futures of People Living with Dementia in Residential Aged Care‚Äô aimed to explore:

  • current barriers to liberty and¬†community access for people living¬†with dementia in RACFs; and
  • the possibilities and challenges of¬†utilising a human rights framework¬†to transform the living and support¬†arrangements of people living with¬†dementia in RACFs.

The first published article, Questioning Segregation of People Living with Dementia in Australia: An International Human Rights Approach to Care Homes, was published last year, and the anthology and project report was published earlier this year, also available to download here.

#HumanRights4All…