Tag Archives: DAI

DAI at the Global Disability Summit in London

Howard Gordon and Professor Peter Mittler relaxing at the Global Disability Summit 2018

Along with Professor Peter Mittler, Howard Gordon attended the recent Global Disability Summit in London, representing Kate Swaffer and DAI at the Civil Society Forum and Global Disability Summit in London on 23rd  Р24thJuly 2018.

Whilst they DAI members wear many hats and advocate at many levels locally, nationally and internationally, Howard and Peter were attending the Summit as members of¬†DAI. Amy Little from GADAA and the Alzheimer’s Society UK supported our members, also enabling DAI to have brochures and materials on the MarketStall she was hosting.

It was also pleasing to note that Nigel Hullah from the 3 Nations Dementia Working Group was also in attendance. Working collaboratively and together, we are so much stronger, especially wheh trying to represent 50 million people.

We have had a lot of activity since this Summit was held, which happened in Chicago, so the number of blogs in our draft folder is rapidly growing, and as we don’t want to overload you, we will only post weekly at this point.

For World Alzheimer’s Month, we intend to have a daily blog, so keep your eyes on your inbox from the 1st of September.

Howard wrote this summary for us:

In June, I learned of the Civil Society Forum and the Global Disability Summit that was to be held in London, organised by the International Disability Alliance and the UK and Kenyan Governments.

On further investigation, neither days appeared involve anyone living with Dementia as a speaker or delegate and I contacted the International Disability Alliance for clarification. After numerous emails from myself, Kate Swaffer and others we finally secured three places as delegates for the two days, one for the Alzheimer’s Society and two for DAI but sadly even though I tried up to the day before, no speaker.

DAI shared a stand with GADAA, the Stride Project and The Alzheimer’s Society and during the intervals we were there talking to delegates and making connections with DAI and the Stride Project.

The objectives of the summit were:

  • Raise global attention and focus on a neglected area
  • Bring in new voices and approaches to broaden engagement
  • Mobilise new global and national commitments on disability and
  • Showcase best practice and evidence from across the world

During the two days there were many opportunities to talk about rights, post-diagnosis support, services, funding and inclusion and although there was no opportunity to speak, I had taken copies of one of the DAI statements prepared by Kate Swaffer and some were placed on the stand and others I handed out as I spoke to delegates, at least DAI’s message was communicated.

One of the videos shown at the Summit

The main opportunities that may come from the two days are:

New DAI members in three African countries.

An invitation for DAI to be involved in the work of the UK Department for International Development and.

A meeting with Sir Philip Alston who is undertaking a UN special investigation into poverty and disabilities in the UK.

The Charter for Change, is full of promise but the devil is in the detail and whether Governments and organisations follow through with their commitments.

If the reaction of a member of the House of Lords to being told I have Dementia during our conversation is anything to go by, I have my doubts.

You can find a shortened version of the charter here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/725336/Global-Disability-Summit-charter-easy-read2.pdf

The two days were different in that the forum was more about DPO’s and NGO’s whereas the Summit was not unexpectedly, more a political backslapping exercise.

DAI Statement

My name is Howard Gordon from Sheffield in the UK, I am a person living with COPD, Alzheimer’s and Frontotemporal Dementia, here today as a member of, and representing Dementia Alliance International, and our Chair and CEO, Kate Swaffer. DAI is an organisation that represents the 50 million people currently living with dementia. I am one of them.

The WHO states there is a new diagnosis of dementia every 3 seconds, and whilst dementia is a chronic, progressive terminal condition, it is also the leading cause of death and disability in older persons.

Dementia Alliance International is the global voice of people with dementia, and Alzheimer’s Disease International is the global voice on dementia. Both are lead organisations of the Global Alzheimer’s & Dementia Action Alliance and the impact of dementia as a disability, and on women are two areas of our focus.

On the occasion of this Global Disability Summit, we ask that the you take notice that many national health systems exclude the collection of data on their citizens over age 60, others only report data to age 49, and less data is collected on women and girls than on men.

There is a need to disaggregate data by disability, sex and age to understand the state of women with disabilities, especially in LMIC’s and remote communities, and informing policies to ensure their effective inclusion and the full realization of their human rights.

Together, we urge continued attention to neurocognitive disorders in national data sets and refer the commission to the work of the Global Dementia Observatory project of the WHO which is developing a knowledge and practice exchange for Member States in support of the Global Dementia action plan as adopted by the WHO in May 2017 and the PAHO regional dementia action plan.

We also note that the disability due to many forms of dementia; especially Alzheimer’s disease often only diagnosed in later life, results in likely undercount of disability and access to rights redress.

Professor Peter Mittler stated in 2016; ‚ÄúAlthough people with dementia are indisputably included in the characterisation of disability in CRPD Article 1, governments are not including them in their implementation of the Convention. This could be considered as an example of systemic discrimination against millions of people.‚ÄĚ

As a member of Dementia Alliance International representing the 50 million people currently living with dementia, and those being diagnosed every 3 seconds, of which the majority are living in lower and middle-income countries, we ask to be included; which also means support to be includes, both in terms of our cognitive and or other disabilities, and funding to enable attendance. Dementia ensures for the vast majority of people, an enforced form of poverty, due to the discrimination and stigma still experienced.

Dementia Alliance International would also like to remind delegates here today that people living with dementia have the same rights as persons with other disabilities, and we must move away from the medicalisation of dementia and instead view it through the lens of acquired disability.

Everyone with dementia is a rights bearer under the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). All State Parties to the CRPD are committed under international law to include persons with dementia in implementation of the convention.

Access to the CRPD is an essential right for all people living with dementia however there is limited evidence this right is being realised. Yet still many with dementia face abuses and violations of their basic rights. This can range from a lack of access to health services, to a culture of discrimination and even violence against those with the condition. People living with dementia everywhere must be supported to claim their rights as human beings with disabilities.

It is also imperative the impact on women and girls of dementia is considered.

Women are disproportionately affected by dementia. More women than men live with dementia, and women and girls provide the majority of unpaid care and face the greatest stigma.

Dementia is listed by the WHO as the fifth highest cause of death for women worldwide and is the leading cause of death and disability in older persons.

Women make up 2/3 of dementia care supporters and more than 70% in lower and middle-income countries. Unpaid women carers compared to male carers, are also more often unemployed due to their unpaid role; girls who are carers also miss out on education.

Everyone impacted by dementia receives little if any health care, including a lack of access to a diagnosis, nor appropriate support to live with dementia once diagnosed.

Older women, especially widows, can be exposed to what has been termed a ‚Äėtriple jeopardy‚Äô discriminated against as a result of their age, sex and condition (carer or diagnosed with dementia).

The stigma surrounding dementia exists universally, with women more likely to be stigmatised in this way.  Extreme forms of discrimination can lead to women with the condition facing abuse, violence and even death.

Governments, international civil society and partners around the world must get behind this global challenge and unite for a world where no woman is left behind because of her dementia.

Gendered barriers to mobility and accessing justice lead to isolation and exclusion.

Understanding intersecting forms of gender- and disability-based violence, exploitation and abuse against women with disabilities including forced medical and psychiatric interventions.

Women with disabilities experience this type of abuse at disproportionately higher rates than others, and in unique forms owing to ingrained discrimination and stigmatization.

It is estimated that women with disabilities are 1.5 to 10 times more likely to be physically or sexually abused by a family member or caregiver than other women.

Women with disabilities are often excluded from national laws and policies and remain marginal to global discussions and agreements relevant to their empowerment. The global women’s agenda seldom takes into consideration the issues and concerns of women with disabilities.

In addition, women with disabilities are also neglected within the disability movement and the mainstream women’s movement. Stand-alone policies on women with disabilities remain limited; they are often excluded in policymaking and decision-making processes.

Finally, we ask governments, Member states, NGO’s, DPO’s and Civil Society to consider their responsibility to provide the financial support so often needed to enable people living with dementia to attend meetings and conferences on these and other matters affecting them, in line with

‚ÄúNothing about us, without us‚ÄĚ,

We therefore ask we leave no one behind, including people with dementia.

The media need to refrain from promoting the perception that we are all suffer, I do not suffer now but I know I will suffer later in my journey, but I do not want to be referred to as a sufferer. If I had Cancer, the media would refer to me as a fighter, yet I am a fighter, I fight every day to live within the reducing limits of my Dementia. Just because I have a terminal disability, does not mean I should not be treated to equally with other persons in my community.

Dementia is no longer a silent disease, we have rights under the UN conventions and we no longer wish to be subjected to the philosophy of BPSD leading to Chemical Restraint, Sectioning and Involuntary Care.

I do not consider myself a sufferer, I am a fighter, fighting my co-morbidities and fighting for our rights

DAI also looks forward to the day when we no longer need to define people by disability, and we are all treated equally.

We therefore ask we leave no one behind through the full implementation of the CRPD, including people with dementia.

Thank you.

Howard Gordon.

Sources for the statement: 

The Dementia Alliance International, the World Health Organisanisation, the United Nations, the CRPD, the Global Alzheimer’s and Dementia Action Alliance, and the Alzheimer’s Society UK.

Civil Society Forum – Day 2 update

In June I was representing DAI in New York attending day 2 of the pre conference Civil Society Forum , followed by the 11th Session of the Conference Of State Parties (COSP) on the Convention of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

I apologise for a late report on it; and there are more to come! Clearly, there are not enough hours in each day, or days in each week!

The Overarching Theme this year of the 11th COSP was¬†‚ÄúLeaving no one behind through the full implementation of the CRPD‚ÄĚ, with the following Subthemes and Crosscutting themes.

Sub-themes:

1. National fiscal space, public-private partnerships and international cooperation for strengthening the implementation of the CRPD
2. Women and girls with disabilities
3. Political participation and equal recognition before the law

Cross-cutting theme:

Promoting high-quality disability statistics and disaggregation of data by disability status for the full realization of the rights of persons with disabilities.

It was very pleasing to be given the opportunity to make various statements, the first one on Day 2 of the Civil Society Forum, the pre COSP event which I was only able to attend on the second day. It was an opportunity to ensure dementia was not forgotten as a condition causing acquired, and progressive cognitive disabilities.

My first statement, not pre-planned, but made in the discussion time after the main speakers in the aftrenoon of Day 2 of the Civil Society  Forum on June 11, 2018 is listed below.

Statement 1 ‚Äď Day 2 of the Civil Society Forum in New York, preceding the COSP.

My name is Kate Swaffer, a co founder and the current Chair and CEO of Dementia Alliance International. I’d first like to thank Klaus Lachwitz from the International Disability Alliance for mentioning dementia in his earlier comment, which was the first time this condition has made it into the discussions today.

I represent the 50 million people currently living with dementia, and am also one of them. The WHO states there is a new diagnosis of dementia every 3 seconds, and whilst dementia is a chronic, progressive terminal condition, it is also the leading cause of death and disability in older persons.

Yet most people in civil society do not yet see this condition as one that brings with it acquired cognitive disabilities, and I ask that we consider this today, to ensure that no one is left behind.

Dementia disproportionality impacts women and girls; more women are diagnosed with dementia, and women and girls make up more than two thirds of unpaid carers, and more than 70% are women and girls in Low and Middle Income Countries.

People with dementia are systematically excluded from rights based and equitable inclusion; the barriers are far more than dementia.

The real barriers are due to stigma, discrimination and the misperceptions about the capacity of people with dementia, and the many breaches of our most basic of human rights.

Inclusion continues to be a ‚Äėtick box‚Äô experience for many of us, and very often, self-advocacy requires significant self-funding, simply to ensure our rights under Articles 4.3 and 33.3, of which discussions have been exclusively focused on today.

We therefore ask for not only inclusion, but for appropriate funding from governments and NGO’s or DPO’s to ensure full and equal inclusion and participation of this cohort, to enable it. As many have speakers have stated today, this is undoubtedly our right.

Thank you.

Kate Swaffer
Chair, CEO & Co-founder
Dementia Alliance International

“Can You Hear Me Now?” by Carole Mullikan

We are honoured to have an article written by dementia advocate and pioneer, Carole Mullikan. Thank you Carole, for sharing your story, and for living so well since her diagnosis in 1995, by role modelling to us all by focusing on what she can still do, and that for many of us, it is possible.

Can You Hear Me Now?

“Not so long ago a man in spectacles paced everywhere testing his phone in a Verizon commercial.

‚ÄúCan you hear me now? Can you hear me now? Can you hear me now?‚ÄĚ

As a first-year teacher, that was a question I often asked myself when in front of a noisy bunch of teenagers. Over time, I learned how to quiet and focus teenagers in a classroom. Yet sometimes I still needed to ask the very back row,

‚ÄúCan you hear me now?‚ÄĚ

When I began making luncheon presentations in ballrooms at state teachers’ conferences, the question arose again. Sometimes microphones are forgotten. Sometimes they malfunction, necessitating greater lung power. Other times they must be tested and adjusted.

‚ÄúCan you hear me now?‚ÄĚ

At one national conference, the microphone was working just fine, but as I took the podium, I glanced up, seeing the massive, multi-layered crystal chandelier above. Good grief! I thought to myself, what could I possibly have to say that was worthy of such splendor? But being a seasoned speaker, I persisted.

These days, I no longer speak in classrooms or at conferences. Most often I speak to just one or a few individuals. That should seem easy, but having been diagnosed with dementia, ‚ÄúCan you hear me now?‚ÄĚ is still an issue. The stigma attached to dementia causes others to listen through a perceptual filter telling them the person with dementia is often confused. What he says may be wrong. She may not have her facts straight. He might be dwelling in the past or experiencing delusions. What a person with dementia says cannot be trusted. Even when I am certain of my facts and speak with authority, I question that they can hear me through the diagnosis of dementia. Too often I fall silent.

Hear me now, please!

Being automatically deprived of my credibility hurts!

Copyright: Carole Mullikan 2017

More about Carole Mulliken: Carole is a DAI member and a member on our recently reinstated DAI Action Group, about to commence moderating a Discussion forum currenty being set up for members. She is also a founding board member of the Dementia Advocacy and Support Network International (DASNI), which was the first international online support group for people of dementia. Unlike DAI, membership was not exclusive to people with dementia.

With a diagnosis of multi infarct dementia, obviously now well over twenty years ago, Carole regards dementia advocacy as a second, unpaid career and herself a veteran of the dementia wars. She lives near Saint Louis, MO, and those of us at DAI salute her for being one of the shining lights who led the way for the rest of us.

Carole worked as an educator, a school counselor, a suicide crisis interventionist, an adjunct professor of composition, an educational consultant for a division of the U.S. Department of Education, and a freelance writer. She wrote and published a monthly online newsletter for an animal shelter and maintained its website. She has published freelance feature articles for print publications and for several websites.  Lisa Genova, Ph.D., author of Still Alice, recognizes DASNI and Carole Mulliken by name as contributing to her own understanding of the lived experience of dementia.

And Then I Looked Up Dementia – Women Speak Out

We are pleased to be part of the launch of this video, highlighting the impact of dementia on women, discussing the higher incidence¬†of women people diagnosed with it, and the higher numbers of woman who become care partners to someone livign with it. Thanks to Amy Little and GAADA for pulling this project together in time for World Alzheimer’s Month 2017.

“Dementia is a global women‚Äôs health, social care and rights issue that can no longer be ignored.

And Then I Looked Up Dementia brings together women living with dementia, the actress Carey Mulligan, iNGO women’s specialists, dementia experts, government representatives and others to speak out for women affected by dementia everywhere.

Dementia is listed by the World Health Organisation in the top ten causes of death for women worldwide and is recognised as a global health priority. Around the world, more women than men live with dementia and face gender-specific barriers to living well with the disease.

Globally, women provide the majority of both unpaid and formal care to people living with dementia. People living with dementia can face stigma and even abuse due to their condition, for older women, age and gender-discrimination can compound this treatment. Take action to get it right for every woman living with or affected by dementia around the world.” GADAA, 2017

To find out more visit https://www.gadaalliance.org/women

DAI and ADI continue to work together

Following a DAI, ADI, GADAA and Swiss Government Side event last night at the 70th World Health Assembly in Geneva, I was also able to sign the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between DAI and ADI, and this photo is of the new CEO, Paola Barbarino and  me signing it. This means the two organisations will continue to work in collaboration, but autonomously, as sister organisations for the benefits of people with dementia and our families, and ensures we have sponsorship to support people with dementia through DAI.

These are my speech notes for the Side Event mentioned above: 

“NEW OPPORTUNITIES FROM THE GLOBAL ACTION PLAN ON DEMENTIA”

Distinguished guests, ladies and gentleman

People with dementia greatly value the global leadership of¬†¬†Dr Saxena, Dr Dua and Dr Margaret Chang and their team, in meeting the needs of people with dementia providing this World Health Organisation “Global Action Plan for a Public Health Approach to Dementia” which we hope will be accepted at the WHA tomorrow or soon after.

I was asked to discuss why a global action plan has been so important to me, and was also given the brief to be challenging. Of course, that is not difficult for me.

In reality, we need this plan because care is failing, and research for a cure is failing.

In representing the global community of people living with dementia, although my own experience is unique, I have been campaigning for human rights based approach to dementia for many years. What this means is a whole of health care approach, and support for disabilities to maintain independence for as long as possible, with educated health care workers who provide optimal care that includes rehabilitation, and dignity for all people.

We wish to state today that we are concerned the Global Action Plan provides little evidence of using the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities to underpin the policy, and therefore ask that we all work together to ensure human rights for all, including people with dementia.

People with dementia are fully recognised by the UN as rights bearers under this treaty, which means that the governments of the 173 Member States who have ratified the Convention have been held to account for their inclusion by the UN Human Rights Bodies since the Treaty came into full operation in 2008.

We ask for the support of all Health Ministers and their governments to enable the 50 million people now living with dementia and the 100 million who must not be Left Behind in 2030 to have access to their rights in international law on the same basis as those with other disabilities.

We will continue to advocate for governments and all members of civil society to work towards ensuring the human rights based approach to dementia will be reflected in their national dementia strategies as we work together to implement this plan in society to ensure a higher quality of life for people living with dementia and our families.

Thank you.

Kate Swaffer
Chair, CEO & Co-founder, Dementia Alliance International

Please note, I only had three minutes as part of a panel, so was unable to give a more complete response from DAI to the Plan.

Dementia Friendly Kiama, by Dennis Frost

Dennis Frost is a member of Dementia Alliance International and also the Inaugural Chair of the Southern Dementia Advisory Group in Kiama NSW, which guides the DFC pilot project between the Kiama Council, University of Wollongong and which Alzheimer;s Australia were also involved in nationally. Many consider this to be the gold standard dementia friendly communities project globally.

Dennis is from NSW and was a keynote speaker at the ADI20-16 conference in Budapest this year titled Dementia Friendly Kiama, which you can view here:

 

Please note: If you are watching this free video, and are employed or can afford to donate the fee you would have paid to attend on the day of $45 USD, please donate here – http://www.dementiaallianceinternational.org/donate/

DAI is a non-profit group of people with dementia from the USA, Canada, Australia and other countries that seek to represent, support, and educate others living with the disease, and an organization that will provide a unified voice of strength, advocacy and support in the fight for individual autonomy and improved quality of life.

Membership of Dementia Alliance International is free, and open to anyone with a medically confirmed diagnosis of any type of dementia.

Join DAI here www.joindai.org

Or you can subscribe to our newsletter or weekly blog here www.infodai.org

YOUR donation ensures there will be ‚ÄėNothing about us, without us‚Äô.

 

Dementia Research Wrap Up #3

Slide3Our latest Dementia Research Wrap Up covering updates from February 2015, by Dr Ian McDonald, the Science Communicator for Alzheimer’s Australia. Thank you Ian.

I recently spoke with Australian researchers at the Florey Institute of Mental Health and Neuroscience who are working on a potential blood test to detect Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers. It might seem strange that researchers are focusing on developing diagnostic tools for dementia without any potential disease modifying therapies on the horizon, but after chatting with the researchers from Florey, they certainly put this research into some perspective.

Dr Blaine Roberts is a blood protein chemist, which means he spends his days looking for markers in the blood associated with disease pathology. He explained the point of his research quite simply by saying:

‚ÄúWith Alzheimer‚Äôs disease we don‚Äôt have that cholesterol test yet or that blood pressure test yet, and that is really what we are trying to get.‚ÄĚ

He went on to say that the point of a blood test wouldn’t be to tell someone they have Alzheimer’s disease, as the point of a cholesterol test isn’t to tell you that you have cardiovascular [heart] disease. An Alzheimer’s blood test would be a screening tool which could be used by doctors to refer you on to a neuropsychologist (if required) and also offer advice on how to potentially change your lifestyle to reduce your risk of dementia and if this eventuates, to offer therapeutic strategies which may be able to minimise the damage that Alzheimer’s disease pathology can do to the brain.

I found this an interesting discussion and you can listen to it in full podcast at http://dementiaresearchfoundation.org.au/listen (Episode 26).

What about a treatment though? Are we getting any closer? Well while it is all still very preliminary, there was some interesting research out of the UK recently which noted that a compound called ‚ÄėBrichos‚Äô, can be effective at inhibiting the mechanisms which trigger the aggregation of the amyloid beta proteins, a major hallmark of Alzheimer‚Äôs disease. However, while this compound has been shown to prevent the accumulation of amyloid beta proteins, there is no evidence that it can remove or break down the amyloid beta plaques once developed. At this point in time, further rigour is required to develop techniques to diagnose Alzheimer‚Äôs disease and other forms of dementia at an earlier stage.

So what is Brichos? It is part of a set of compounds known as ‚Äėchaperone‚Äô proteins, which evolve to help other proteins fold or unfold to prevent protein aggregation.

According to the Cambridge University Press Release:

‚ÄúBrichos sticks to threads made up of malfunctioning proteins, called amyloid fibrils, which are the hallmark of the [Alzheimer‚Äôs] disease. By doing so, it stops these threads from coming into contact with other proteins, thereby helping to avoid the formation of highly toxic clusters that enable the condition to proliferate in the brain.‚ÄĚ

I‚Äôll keep you posted about any further research in this area. To finish off this month‚Äôs research wrap up, I want to highlight another great study out of the USA which is really putting its own twist on the way we currently look at dementia research. The study known as ‚ÄėSuperAgers‚Äô aims to better understand and identify factors that contribute to SuperAging – the maintenance of cognitive functioning in older age. To qualify as a SuperAger, participants had to score a certain level on a variety of mental tests, undertake periodic brain scans and medical tests, and agree to donate their brains after death. Over 400 people registered for the study, with only 35 meeting the requirements to be considered a SuperAger. This study has been ongoing since 2007.

So what is special about SuperAgers? The latest results, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, gave us some more insight. Using MRI brain imaging techniques, the researchers compared 31 SuperAger brains to 21 brains of a similar age and 18 brains aged in their 50s and 60s. As part of the trial, post-mortem analysis of five of the ‚ÄėSuperAger‚Äô brains was also conducted. Combining all the data, results revealed that ‚ÄėSuperAger‚Äô brains had a significantly thicker region of the anterior cingulate cortex, a region of the brain indirectly related to memory through its influence on related functions such as cognitive control, executive function, conflict resolution, motivation and perseverance. It was also noted that ‚ÄėSuperAger‚Äô brains had significantly fewer neurofibrillary tangles (twisted fibres consisting of the Tau protein which cause brain cell death) and a large supply of a specific brain cell called ‚Äėvon Economo‚Äô, which are linked to higher social intelligence.

It is the hope that the ‚ÄėSuperAgers‚Äô study will create a better understanding around why some people may not get dementia in later life and thus the researchers can develop a set of recommendations to advise the public on how to reduce your risk of dementia. The ‚ÄėSuperAgers‚Äô study is still ongoing and I‚Äôll keep you posted about further results. To find out more about the latest dementia research you can follow the Dementia News blog at http://dementiaresearchfoundation.org.au/blog and sign up via http://dementiaresearchfoundation.org.au/dementia-news

Author: Dr Ian McDonald

Master Class 2: My Conversation with My Doctor

It has been an extraordinarily busy time so far during Dementia Awareness Month 2014, and the second Master Class is now available to view here and on YouTube. Congratulations to DAI members, John Sandblom, Jennifer Bute and Dave Kramer for sharing your experience and wisdom with our members and in fact, the world! Eventually!

Published on our YouTube channel September 11, 2014

In this webinar, our panel shared their experiences of sitting on both sides of the table ‚Äď physician and patient — and talked about how to make the most of your visit to your doctor, how to get the information you need, how to understand what the physician is telling you, and how to advocate for yourself.

You can register here for Master Class 3 on September 17: Advocacy and Speaking Out. Click here for class times, class description, and to register.

MEDICAL DISCLAIMER: Information and other content included on this Site or in this video (Master Class 2: My Conversation with My Doctor) is for general informational and educational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for the advice provided by a professional health care provider. This site and video does not provide medical advice. You may not use or rely on any information contained on the Site or in the Video for diagnosing a health or medical problem or disease. You should always consult a professional health care provider regarding any health or medical condition, prevention, or treatment. Do not delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice on account of something you have read on www.dementiaallianceinternational.org or viewed or heard in a video on this Dementia Alliance International YouTube channel.