Tag Archives: DAI

Welcome to Brain Health Awareness Month

Hello! We are already seven days into Brain Health Awareness Month, and have not yet posted anything about it! Oops!

So, to kickstart this theme, we are sharing an update from a senior leader and member of DAI, Valerie Schache, who recently took over hosting the twice monthly Brain Health Meetigns we hold as part of our Brain Health Hub.

Val writes:

Brain Health Hub is a very special arm of Dementia Alliance International. It came about when a number of enthusiastic people kept on talking about the benefits of the Bredesen type protocol.  It was then suggested we start our own group, which still meets fortnightly on a Tuesday morning for me in Australia.

I’ve contributed to the hub from the beginning  and continue to be passionate about the latest  research /science-based evidence but also people’s testimonials on what has changed their dementia journey. Most has been for the better but if an action hasn’t been wise or helpful re health or supplements;  that is also discussed.  The strength of the group is that no question can’t be asked.

In line with DAI principles, medical advice is not given but suggestions are made to discuss with your relevant health professional if this advice is suitable for you.

I’m Valerie Schache now 69- I’m called Val and I was diagnosed in 2015 as a  Young Onset Dementia. I have a mixed dementia and keep confounding experts as like many in the Brain Health Hub we have reversed some dementia symptoms, stabilised others and keep chasing  improvement.  I prefer  the guidance of Functional Integrated Medicine – aka a multi modal holistic approach of precision medicine.

My background – I grew up on a farm is South Australia and pioneered many things in farming and my 32 years in my physiotherapy profession. The most notable is to be the first acupuncturist physiotherapist in public health in all of Australia in 1989. TCM Traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncture helps  staying well with health  co- morbidities including dementia. I was a rural/ remote physio until moving to Ballina NSW  in 1987 and practiced till 2005.

Dementia deficits have not affected my considerable physiotherapy and acupuncture knowledge.  I can still read a scientific paper of any genre and give back six points in plain speak depending on my audience.  I have taken courses at our local University to distinguish fake science from credible research and findings.

I’m passionate about making a better way for people being diagnosed with MCI or dementia to be able to have a future and a hope. I didn’t laugh until I found DAI zoom support groups in 2016.

Being part of Brain Health Hub had allowed me to continue to   be a community educator for best practice and outcomes. It has given me great joy to see the likes of co- founder Maria Turner Paula Wolfert and Chrissy Theilker helped.  Bill Yeates is a fellow Aussie scientist  with insights and scientific approach.

I’m honoured to host the  DAI Brain Health Hub group. We welcome new people to come and join as they are able.  No questions can not be asked. I’ve found deep friendships develop over the time as we share triumphs and sorrows.  We have each other’s back and kindness covers all we do.

Meeting formats sometimes include a theme or specific topic, a video or a guest speaker.   The group is driven by the members ideas, themes, suggestions and most importantly, their needs.

Everyone is welcome!

People with and without dementia can join these meetings, whether you are supporting your own brain health, looking after someone with dementia, or simply interested in it. Please contact  us here to receive the emails with dates and login details.

Thanks Val!

Watch now – Disrupted! Resiliently Reintegrating After Stress & Adversity

DAI’s “Meeting Of The Minds” April Webinar, Disrupted! Resiliently Reintegrating After Stress & Adversity, by Dr. Kozhi Sidney Makai is available to watch now! The feedback we received during the session was extremely positive, and Kozhi’s presentation topped up the “resilience, gratitude and optimism tanks” for those who attended!

  • “He’s fabulous! I could listen to him all day”
  • “So grateful for this, so important for all to hear.”
  • “Loving how he affirms what DAI and us are doing well. Love how narrativews help reduce our stressors.”
  • “Happy to join …  My takeaway: Be positive. Stay positive. Keep moving forward. Try look for a positive every day, even though some days we have to try harder.”
  • “I am loving this session. One of the best sessions yet – well done DAI”
  • “I so needed to hear all of this today!  Thank you Kozhi for sharing your gift.”
  • “Off to buy on axe now “

 

About this presentation: Dr Makai shared how stress has become ubiquitous in our vocabulary. We’re stressed about work, school, our children, our finances, and, yes, we’re stressed about stress. What if you could transform your stress into power? And your anxiety into opportunity? Disrupted! walks you through the psychological, emotional, and physical opportunities that lie dormant within stress; and gives you the tools to trigger the release of tremendous personal power. Dr. Makai expertly wove scientific research with real-life stories to show you how to not just go through stress and adversity, but to grow through it.

About Dr Kozhi Makai: Kozhi Makai Worldwide, an idea studio focused on using behavioral science to help others thrive — especially in the workplace. Dr. Makai passionately lives out his purpose as a performance psychologist to organizations and as a Special Duty Officer in the United States Navy Reserve. He earned his Ph.D. in Applied Management & Decision Sciences from Walden University and his Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology from CalSouthern University.

It is not too late to donate or partner with DAI.

It is through donations that we can continue to provide free membership and services for members, and free webinars for you.

International Day of Families 2021

International Day of Families (IDF) 2021 Theme: Families and New Technologies

On May 15 each year, DAI joins the world in observing the UN International Day of Families (IDF).

This year it focuses on the impacts of new technologies on the well-being of families. Megatrends including new technologies, urbanization, migration, climate change and changing demographics are dramatically reshaping our world.

These megatrends impact families around the world, including the families of people living with dementia.

It is up to all of us to ensure digital technologies support the transition towards sustainable development and enable the well-being of all people.

Technology is critically important to the work that DAI does.

As an early adopter of Zoom, DAI has been providing free online support groups and educational webinars for seven years. For people with dementia – and their families – as well as education through zoom for professionals, researchers, ehlth care professionals and the whole community – these events really matter.

Digital technologies like video conferencing and social media make it possible for people with dementia and their families to stay connected in an ever-changing world.

At Dementia Alliance International, we believe in a world where all people are valued and included.

If you do too, please consider becoming a regular supporter.

Your donation helps provide free online support groups for people living with dementia, and free community educational opportunities for families, friends, care partners, and the wider dementia community. Every dollar makes a difference in the life of someone living with a diagnosis of dementia!

And if you work with people with dementia, or know someone with dementia, please refer them to join DAI for free services and support, especially the ‘life-saving’ peer to peer support groups.

THANK YOU

Introducing our new Chair, Alister Robertson

Alister Robertson, NZ

As we celebrate our 7th birthday this week, we are also delighted to introduce Dementia Alliance International (DAI) member Alister Robertson as our new Chair.

Alister has been a member since 2016, and has recently stepped down as our Vice Chair, to take on the role of Chair.

We are truly delighted to introduce Alister Robertson as our new Chair to  you. Alister has been a member of Dementia Alliance International (DAI) since 2016, and has recently stepped down as our Vice Chair, to take on the role of Chair.

Alister is taking over from Kate Swaffer who continues as a board member, and the CEO.

About Alister: Alister’s new leadership role has been endorsed and welcomed by the Board of Directors and by our members, and is recognition of the hard work Alister has done globally for our members, and in New Zealand where he is on the Board of Alzheimers New Zealand and a member of their Advisory Group.

He has a strong commitment to supporting people with dementia to have a voice, and to be included locally, nationally and globally.

Alister graduated from Lincoln University, Canterbury New Zealand in 1978 with Bachelor Agricultural Commerce. Spent the following 30+ years in the rural finance sector lending money to the primary sector.

In 2009 Alister and his wife, Charlene decided they would like to do something together, given their four sons had finished their schooling and were doing their own thing. Alister and Charlene resigned from their respective jobs, sold their newly built home and purchased a Motel in Taupo, which they sold four years later.

They then moved to Napier, Hawkes Bay (2013) to be closer to their son and his family. They had a retail and café business until Alister’s dementia diagnosis.

Alister’s father had Alzheimer’s and Alister was diagnosed with younger onset Alzheimer’s in 2014, aged 60 years. He endeavours to follow the advice of trying to maintain a healthy brain by way of diet, remaining socially involved, good sleep, staying mentally active and exercise. Alister is a keen cyclist, which is his main mode of transport and this helps keeping him fit.

Alister participates in the various activities provided by DAI and would like to see more Kiwi’s become active members of DAI, as well as more people with dementia globally to join for peer-to-peer support, and to get involved in the global work done by DAI.

Help people with dementia to continue to be included, to be supported and to have a voice, by donating today. 

Thank you.

Bobby Redman shares why she is glad she found DAI #DAM2020

Wow! It is already Day 12 of Dementia Awareness Month 2020, and our daily vlog/blog series continues. We really hope you have enjoyed hearing from people diagnosed with dementia from around the world again this year!

DAI member Bobby Redman from the Central Coast in Australia shares why she is glad she found DAI. Bobby is a very active advocate and volunteer, including co-hosting three DAI peer to peer support groups, leading the DAI Action group; she is also a member of the board.

Thank you Bobby. We are very glad you found DAI!

Since you’re here…

… we’re asking readers like you to support our members, by donating to our organizaton.

With more than 50 million people living with dementia, and the Coronavisus pandemic causing everyone to operate in a virtual world,  our work has never been more important.

Every contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to our work of supporting people diagnosed with any type of dementia to live more positively, and with a greater sense of hope.  Thank  you.

Please join the Monday Science Podcast fundraiser to support more people with dementia like Bobby.

 

Emily Tan Tan Ong shares why she is glad she found DAI

On day 8 of the #DAI Dementia Awareness Month series of blogs or vlogs on why members are glad they found DAI, and  why DAI is Life Changing, Emily (Tan Tan) Ong shares with us why she is glad she found DAI.

Emily also shares how DAI has so positively impacted her self avocacy and courage, and her advocacy for others also living with dementia in Singapore and beyond. #DAM2020

Thank you Emily. We are glad you joined DAI.

 

Reminder: the Monday Science Podcast Dementia Series is Fundraising for DAI

#DAIisLifeChanging

Webinar: Human Rights as a Practice Model in Residential Aged Care

We invite you to join us for our September 2020 “Meeting Of The Minds” Webinar,  Human Rights as a Practice Model in Residential Aged Care, presented by Daniella Greenwood.

  • Wednesday, September 23, 2020 (USA/CA/UK/EU)
  • Thursday, September 24, 2020 (AU/NZ/Asia)
  • Please note: this is one event, set in a number of different time zones.

Human Rights in residential aged care have never been so important!  At this time of the Coronavirus pandemic, when lockdowns and other restrictions have been enforced on families and residents, the many breaches of human rights these people already face have increased.  On top of that, the number of deaths in aged care due to this pandemic is truly tragic. Please do join us for this inspiring speaker, and an innovative and new way of supporting people living in residential aged care (nursing homes).

Register here…

Wednesday, September 23, 2020 (USA/CA/UK/EU):    

  • 2:00 pm  Pacific
  • 3:00 pm   Mountain
  • 4:00 pm   Central
  • 5:00 pm   Eastern
  • 10:00 pm  London/Glasgow/Dublin UK
  • 11:00 pm  Paris, Munich, Amsterdam, EU

Thursday, September 24, 2020 ( AU/NZ/ASIA):

  • 5:00 am  Perth, AU/Taipei/Singapore
  • 6:30 am   Adelaide, AU
  • 7:00 am   Sydney/Melbourne/Canberra/Tasmania/Brisbane, AU
  • 9:00 am   Auckland, NZ

The Webinar runs for up to 1.5 hours.

Check your time if not listed above with this link.
Donate to DAI or become an Associate or Strategic Partner.
Volunteer for DAI: [email protected]

Register here…

YOUR DONATIONS SUPPORT DAI IN MANY WAYS:

  • $US 5.00 covers the average cost of one of our monthly bank fees
  • $US 200.00 covers the cost of our monthly Zoom subscription fee
  • $US 120.00 covers the average monthly cost of the MailChimp subscription
  • $US 300.00 covers the current cost of 3 months of website management fees

PLEASE DONATE TO DAI OR BECOME AN ASSOCIATE OR PARTNER; WITHOUT YOUR SUPPORT, DAI COULD NOT PROVIDE THE SERVICES WE PROVIDE CURRENTLY FOR MEMBERS, THEIR FAMILIES & THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY.

Support people with dementia:

THANK YOU

**************************************************************************

You can view videos of previous DAI “A Meeting Of The Minds” Webinars on the on the DAI YouTube Channel

Please note: Whilst we usually publish the recording of the event on YouTube afterwards, it does not include the Q & A sessions, and occasionally, we do not publicly publish recordings of your online Webinars at all, so if you don’t register to attend, you may miss seeing our events.

Webinar: What People Living with Dementia Teach Us About Our Shared Humanity

We invite you to join us for our August 2020 “Meeting Of The Minds” Webinar”,  What People Living with Dementia Teach Us About Our Shared Humanity presented by Professor Emeritus Steven Sabat.

  • Wednesday, August 26, 2020 (USA/CA/UK/EU)
  • Thursday, August 27, 2020 (AU/NZ/JP/SGP/TWN)

Please note: this is one event, set in a number of different time zones.

Register here…

About the Webinar: How we view and approach people with dementia in the process of providing care is critical to whether or not we see and facilitate many of their intact cognitive and social abilities.  Approaching people diagnosed mainly with their presenting symptoms in mind and viewing one’s job as performing particular physical care-oriented tasks will not facilitate the expression of such persons’ remaining abilities and will often prevent those abilities from surfacing.

“Engaging with” people diagnosed with genuine human interest in learning about the person’s past life and interests, proclivities, desires, creates an “I-Thou” connection that will have the opposite effect: their often substantial cognitive, social, and emotional abilities will be revealed.

Thus “dementia care” requires human interaction with someone who is much more than a “dementia patient”, but is viewed and honoured as a human being who deserves to be treated as a person, not just as a patient.  I shall discuss a host of valued attributes that are shared by people living with dementia and those deemed healthy so as to illustrate the commonalities we all share.

About Professor Sabat: Steven R. Sabat is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Georgetown University. His research for the past 39 years has focused on the intact cognitive and social abilities and the subjective experience of people with moderate to severe dementia, as well as enhancing communication between people living with dementia and their care partnerrs. He is the author of numerous articles in scientific journals and in books.  As well, he is author of The Experience of Alzheimer’s Disease: Life through a Tangled Veil (2001), Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia: What Everyone Needs to Know (2018) and co-editor of Dementia: Mind, Meaning, and the Person (2006)

Wednesday, August 26, 2020 (USA/CA/UK/EU):

  • 2:00 pm Pacific
  • 3:00 pm Mountain
  • 4:00 pm Central
  • 5:00 pm Eastern
  • 10:00 pm London/Glasgow/Dublin UK
  • 11:00 pm Paris, Munich, Amsterdam, EU

Thursday, August 27, 2020 (AU/NZ/ASIA):

  • 5:00 am Perth, AU/Taipei/Singapore
  • 6:30 am Adelaide, AU
  • 7:00 am Sydney/Melbourne/Canberra/Tasmania/Brisbane, AU
  • 9:00 am Auckland, NZ

The Webinar runs for up to 1.5 hours.

Check your time if not listed above with this link.

COST TO ATTEND:

  • DAI Members: FREE
  • Care partners of DAI Memers: FREE
  • Healthcare professionals: FREE (Donation to attend appreciated)
  • Researchers: FREE (Donation to attend appreciated)
  • General public: FREE (Donation to attend appreciated)

Register here…

 

YOUR DONATIONS SUPPORT US IN MANY WAYS:

  • $US 5.00 covers the average cost of one of our monthly bank fees
  • $US 200.00 covers the cost of our monthly Zoom subscription fee
  • $US 120.00 covers the average monthly cost of the MailChimp subscription
  • $US 300.00 covers the current cost of 3 months of website management fees

PLEASE DONATE TO DAI OR BECOME AN ASSOCIATE OR PARTNER. WITHOUT THEM, DAI COULD NOT PROVIDE THE SERVICES WE PROVIDE CURRENTLY FOR MEMBERS, THEIR FAMILIES & THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY.

Support people with dementia:

THANK YOU

**************************************************************************

You can view videos of previous DAI “A Meeting of the Minds” Webinars on the You can view videos of previous DAI “A Meeting of the Minds” Webinars on the DAI YouTube Channel

Please note: Whilst we usually publish the recording of the event on YouTube afterwards, it does not include the Q & A sessions, and occasionally, we do not publicly publish recordings of your online Webinars at all, so if you don’t register to attend, you may miss seeing our events.

GLAD Call TO Action: A Call To Rebuild a Future Inclusive of All

Dementia Alliance International signed on this week to the GLAD Network (the Global Action on Disability) Call To Action: A Call To Rebuild a Future Inclusive of All.

We are one of many organisations supporting this important Call to Action to all stakeholders to include persons with all types of disabilities in the response and recovery phases of the Covid-19.

The letter below confirms our endorsement of this important Call To Action, and includes links to the Call To Action and other information. Please also note, the Call to Action is still open for endorsement by all stakeholders and GLAD would welcome endorsement by additional partners using this form.

Dear Kate,

The co-chairs of the Global Action on Disability (GLAD) Network – the United Kingdom Department for International Development, the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the International Disability Alliance – would like to extend our sincere gratitude for endorsing the Call to Rebuild a Future Inclusive of All. The Call to Action demands the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the response and recovery phases of the COVID-19.

Please be informed that your organization’s logo has been included  in the official Call to Action document, which can be accessed here.

The Call to Action is still open for endorsement by all stakeholders and we would welcome endorsement by additional partners. To invite your partners, please feel free to share with them this page where more information on the Call to Action and its endorsement can be found.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Thank you very much.

Sincerely,

Penny Innes, Head, Disability Inclusion Team
United Kingdom Department for International Development

Jon Lomøy, Special Representative
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Government of Norway

Vladimir Cuk, Executive Director
International Disability Alliance

HLPF Statement to WHO: WHO Civil Society Working Group on NCDs

The 36 members of the WHO Civil Society Working Group on NCDs (Non Communicable Diseases) commend the World Health Organization and Dr Tedros for his leadership as the world grapples with the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. An empowered, well-resourced WHO is essential to lead governments, other stakeholders, and people through these trying times.

HLPF Statement to Member States
WHO Civil Society Working Group on NCDs

Published 12 July 2020
Author: WHO Civil Society Working Group on NCD’s
Download document or read the full statement here:

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed health system gaps and vulnerabilities across the world and has demonstrated more than ever the need for resilient health systems, especially ones that are equipped to respond to the growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and mental disorders.

As budgets are reallocated and ministry of health staff are reassigned to respond to the crisis, attention to NCDs and other chronic conditions (including prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and palliative care) has largely fallen off the radar – in particular for hypertension and cardiovascular emergencies, cancer, diabetes, respiratory diseases, obesity, mental disorders and neurological health conditions including dementia.

Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, people of all ages, who are living with NCDs, are more vulnerable to becoming severely ill and/or dying from COVID-19 or from a lack of health care service delivery for their untreated NCDs. It is therefore crucial that we “build back better” health systems and minimize disruptions to lifesaving prevention, diagnosis and care for those living with NCDs.

We call on Member States to:

  • Ensure NCDs prevention, diagnosis, treatment and palliative care are included in national emergency response and preparedness plans, beginning with inclusion of NCDs in national COVID-19 response plans in the context of universal health coverage and sustainable development.
  • Acknowledge the interconnections between global health security, COVID-19 complications and chronic conditions like NCDs and address these by developing, and scaling-up the implementation of robust national NCD action plans to protect and strengthen population health. These should prioritize the WHO ‘Best Buys and other recommended interventions’ and other relevant conventions and plans such as the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, WHO Global Action Plan on Physical Activity, the WHO Global Strategy to Reduce the Harmful Use of Alcohol, the WHO Global Action Plan on the public health response to dementia, the WHO Mental Health Action Plan and forthcoming recommendations to address mental health conditions and air pollution.
  • Strengthen national resilience to build back better by ensuring support for dedicated health promotion and prevention institutions, ensuring that COVID-19 policy responses do not inadvertently increase exposure to key NCD risk factors and the burden of NCDs in the long-term,  and strengthening workforce competency in health promotion and NCD prevention and control.
  • Allocate sufficient and sustainable financing to enable health promotion and NCD prevention and control programmes and policies to be fully implemented to scale.
  • Raise tobacco taxes and implement taxes on other unhealthy commodities like alcohol and ultra-processed foods and sugar-sweetened beverages to simultaneously improve the health of the populace, reduce health inequities, and lessen the burden on health systems. These taxes can also raise much-needed revenue to help finance health, socio-economic, development and/or pandemic response efforts.
  • Continue and sustain the delivery of routine chronic care, supplies of essential medicines, vaccines and technologies, screening and diagnosis, access to resources, and supportive and palliative services for ongoing management of NCDs, mental health, and other chronic conditions.
  • Develop guidelines at national and global levels specifically for People Living with NCDs to successfully manage their conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Adopt innovative approaches, including digital health solutions, to enhance efficiency within health systems.
  • Ensure healthcare workers are recruited, trained, protected, and well-resourced to meet the current and future demand for chronic care and the COVID-19 pandemic and that healthcare research is properly funded, to support the development of innovative, evidence-based approaches to NCDs prevention and treatment in the setting of COVID-19 pandemic. Special attention is also needed to ensure the mental health and well-being of healthcare workers is supported and action is taken to prevent and control violence against health workers.
  • Systematically and meaningfully engage civil society groups and vulnerable groups (including people living with NCDs and other comorbidities, older people, and young people) in the development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of international, national, and local COVID-19 responses.
  • Adopt a whole-of-government approach to COVID-19 to ensure the adoption of robust, evidence-based policies and plans, which do not expose governments to real or perceived conflicts of interest (such as through corporate social responsibility activities by unhealthy commodity industries) and which ensure access to safe, affordable and equitable access to essential health products (such as PPE, essential medicines including controlled medicines for palliative care) as part of a global response.

The WHO Civil Society Working Group on NCDs and the NCD community remains committed to elevating the voices of civil society and people living with NCDs and supporting WHO and governments during this pandemic and in the post-pandemic recovery period.

Members of the WHO Civil Society Working Group on NCDs

  1. Dr Monika Arora, Healthy India Alliance, India
  2. Ms Kwanele Asante, Our Views, Our Voices global advisory committee, South Africa
  3. Prof Naby Baldé, International Diabetes Federation, Guinea
  4. Mr Stephane Besançon, Santé Diabète, France
  5. Mr Enzo Bondioni, World Dental Federation, Switzerland
  6. Ms Chantelle Booysen, Youth Leaders for the Lancet Commission on Global Mental Health and Sustainable Development, South Africa
  7. Dr Beatriz Champagne, Healthy Latin America Coalition, Argentina
  8. Dr Stephen Connor, World Palliative Care Alliance, USA
  9. Ms Katie Dain, CEO, NCD Alliance (Co-Chair)
  10. Dr Mitra Rouhi Dehkordi, The Association for International Sports for All, Iran
  11. Dr Ulysses Dorotheo, South East Asia Tobacco Control Alliance, Philippines
  12. Dr Ibtihal Fadhil, EMRO NCD Alliance, Iraq
  13. Dr Mychelle Farmer, NCD Child, USA
  14. Mr Juan Núñez Guadarrama, Salud Justa, Mexico
  15. Sir Trevor Hassell, Healthy Caribbean Coalition, Barbados
  16. Mr David Kalema, Hope and Beyond, Uganda
  17. Mr Chris Lynch, Alzheimer’s Disease International, United Kingdom
  18. Princess Dina Mired, Union for International Cancer Control, Jordan
  19. Dr Mwai Makoka, World Council of Churches, Malawi
  20. Ms Narcisa Mashienta, Ikiama Nukuri, Ecuador
  21. Dr George Msengi, NCD Child, Tanzania
  22. Mr Christophe Ngendahayo, International Federation of Medical Students Associations, Rwanda
  23. Ms Leslie Rae, Framework Convention Alliance, Canada
  24. Ms Johanna Ralston, World Obesity Federation, USA
  25. Ms Belen Ríos, O´Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, Georgetown University, USA
  26. Prof Trevor Shilton, International Union for Health Promotion and Education, and International Society for Physical Activity and Health, Australia
  27. Dr Sudhvir Singh, EAT Foundation, Norway
  28. Dr Tara Singh Bam, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Nepal
  29. Ms Anjali Singla, Movement for Global Mental Health, India
  30. Ms Kristina Sperkova, Movendi International, Slovakia
  31. Ms Charlene Sunkel, Global Mental Health Peer Network, South Africa
  32. Ms Kate Swaffer, Dementia Alliance International, Australia
  33. Ms Phaeba Thomas, HealthBridge South Asia, India
  34. Dr Nick Watts, Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change, United Kingdom
  35. Prof Gerald Yonga, East Africa NCD Alliance, Kenya
  36. Dr Yoshitake Yokokura, World Medical Association, Japan