Tag Archives: Communicating with a person with aphasia

Communicating with a person with aphasia

Image source: Kate Swaffer

In the last few weeks, a lot of people and organizations who have never before used zoom (or a similar online platform) have had to meet online for work, family and social gatherings.

Even organizations who have been using zoom for a long time, have started producing help sheets and other resources on how to use it. At last… the world is catching up, and people with dementia really appreciate it!

Online communicating is difficult, but for many who are diagnosed with dementia, is preferable to a phone call, as we can see the others persons face and expressions, and therefore alsohave a visual cue beyond a name of who we are talking to.

For those with dementia who also have aphasia such as Primary Progressive Aphasia, it is not easy to communicate in person, let alone online, hence we wanted to post this blog with some tips and other resources.

DAI has posted blogs on aphasia previously, including a short video in 2016 on a post titleed Understanding Aphasia. This DAI blog also has a caregivers guide, produced by the National Aphasia Association, and the following video is worth watching (again).

The National Aphasia Association in America also has a lot of useful information on their website.

Tips for Communicating with a Person with Aphasia

These tips may make it easier for you to understand and talk with people with any type of aphasia. To help a person with aphasia communicate with you, try the following:

  1. Get their attention before you start speaking.
  2. Keep eye contact.
  3. Watch for body language and the gestures used.
  4. Talk in a quiet place. Turn off the TV or radio, and reduce other noise. Ask others in the area to do the same.
  5. Keep your voice at a normal level. You do not need to talk louder unless you are asked to (we are not all hearing impaired).
  6. Keep the words you use simple but adult. Do not “talk down” to the person with aphasia, as if having aphasia (or dementia) means having intellectual deficits.
  7. Use shorter sentences, and if possible, repeat key words that are important to understand.
  8. Slow down your speech, but not so much that is sounds insulting or patronising.
  9. Give the person time to speak; it may take longer.
  10. Try not to finish sentences or find words for them; this poem may help explain why.
  11. Try using drawings, gestures, writing, and facial expressions. People may understand those better than words sometimes.
  12. Ask the person with aphasia to draw, write, or point when  having trouble talking.
  13. Ask more “yes” and “no” questions. Those are easier than questions thatare need to be answered using lots of words or sentences.
  14. It is ok if the peson makes mistakes sometimes. They  may not be able to say everything perfectly all the time, but neither may you.
  15. Let them try to do things for themselves, even if they need to try a few times. Help me when help is asked for. Unless it is dangerous there is no need to intervene uness asked to.
  16. Aphasia does not equate to an intellectual disability, but rather is a language impairment or disability

Whilst DAI currently does not have peer to peer support groups specifically for people with aphasia, if we have enough requests to do so again, we will do o ur best to set one up. Contact us at [email protected] if you or someone you support is interested.

Register now for our June “Meeting Of The Minds” Webinar, Dementia, Human Rights, Selfcare and COVID-19