Tag Archives: Alzheimer’s Scotland

‘Tackling Dementia – It’s Everybody’s Business’

DAI is proud to support Alzheimer’s New Zealand today by promoting their upcoming biannual conference.

Alzheimer’s New Zealand is a member of our strategic partner, Alzheimer’s Disease International.

Although DAI is regularly asked to promote conferences, if we did this for every dementia related conference in the world, our site would be transformed from one for people with dementia (our members), into a global confernce program, so instead, we limit this to ADI members only, as requested.

DAI also heavily promotes the attendance  of members and their care partners to attend ADI and ADI member conferences, and does quite lot of fundraising to support attendance. It is wondeful that Alzhemer’s New Zealand have found a sponsor the the second time so that registration for peoplewith dementia and thei care parter is free again.

Alzheimer’s Scotland managed to do this for their conference this year as well, an important step to ensuring equal and full inclusion of peoiple with dementia, most who are no longer working due to the disease, or the stigma and discrimiantion dementia brings with it.

We ask that you please consider attending this very important conference, which is only held every two years.

‘Tackling Dementia – It’s Everybody’s Business’ is the premier conference focused on dementia in New Zealand.

The Conference is an opportunity to engage in a multi-sector conversation on how services for people with dementia can be transformed to reflect a world of more choice, flexibility and quick access to support; and to harness the best insights and knowledge from a range of sectors that can all help New Zealand meet the dementia challenge.

Abstracts are up to 250 words in length and if accepted, will be followed up with an oral presentation at this exciting conference.

Submissions close on Friday 22nd June 2018, and acceptance/non-acceptance will be advised by Monday 9th July 2018.

Abstract themes

We invite abstracts reflecting the programme themes:

  • Peer services – people living with dementia supporting themselves and each other
    Includes services delivered by and for people living with dementia

  • Citizenship and rights for people with dementia
    Includes dementia friendly programmes, services and standards, the review of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and supported decision making

  • Effectiveness – the evidence for the right things to do
    Includes therapeutic interventions, the role of service navigation, the lived experience of dementia, biomedical developments and delivery models

  • Innovations – from the margins to the centre: New ideas and thinking
    Includes anything and everything that has the potential to transform the way we experience dementia

One of our blogs from 2015 provides guidelines on attending conferences, especially on how to write and submit an abstract, which you can read here...

If you need any assistance, please do not hesitate to contact us by email.

Human rights are not an abstract concept, by Owen Miller

blogs_guest_owenmiller_140x140px-wpcf_128x128With permission, we are publishing this blog written by by Owen Miller. It was initially published as part of the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) #RightApproach campaign, and can be viewed here.

Thank you Own, for permission to publish it in full here for our members and supporters, and thank you Alzheimer’s Scotland who have lead the human rights base approach to dementia, which DAI, with the support of our Human Rights Advisor Professor Peter Mittler is now working so hard towards making a reality globally.

Human rights are not an abstract concept

By Own Miller, first published on September 1, 2016

“Taking the #rightapproach empowers people with dementia and their carers.

Human rights are inalienable to each and every person. They cannot be given to us. But they can be obstructed or restricted by a number of factors, some unintentional.

Every day we exercise our human rights in a number of ways, so much so that we take them for granted. Our communication, our choices and our actions are human rights playing out in practice. They are fundamental to who we are as individuals and allow us to play active roles in the societies in which we live, take part in activities we enjoy and go about our lives in a meaningful way.

But too often people with dementia find their rights restricted by the stigma which often surrounds their condition. Assumptions are made about a person’s capacity to make decisions. Risk-aversion becomes standard practice. Attention turns to what a person cannot do rather than what they can. Often this comes about as a result of circumstances in which well-meaning attempts are made to protect the person from harm or do what is perceived to be in their best interests. However, it is often the case that doing so fundamentally fails to respect the person as someone with unique experiences, interests and abilities, who can still actively and meaningfully engage with their community.

Alzheimer Scotland’s public policy work is grounded in a rights-based approach at both a national and local level.

The PANEL (Participation, Accountability, Non-Discrimination, Empowerment and Legality) principles provide a strong framework for ensuring that a rights-based approach is taken in in practice. This can be applied in a range of contexts and settings, from the way an individual is treated as the result of stigma up to the highest level of decision making on health and social care services.

Alzheimer Scotland’s public policy work is grounded in a rights-based approach at both a national and local level. A fundamental part of this involves making sure that the views and experiences of people with dementia, their families and carers, underpin our own internal policy development; for example, our 8 Pillars Model of Community Support and Advanced Dementia Practice Model.

Externally, the Scottish Dementia Working Group and the National Dementia Carers Action Network are well established national groups which have led the way in showing how involvement can work. Both groups meet with Scottish Ministers and civil servants to discuss issues which matter to them and have been involved in the development and implementation of Scotland’s dementia strategies. They have also informed national training programmes such as the Promoting Excellence Framework and worked with academic institutions to share their experiences with nursing and Allied Health Professional students to raise awareness of future generations of practitioners.

More recently, local groups have come together to shape their communities. They have been engaging decision makers within Integrated Joint Boards, helping local businesses and organisations to become more Dementia friendly, and working with local schools to raise awareness of dementia amongst younger people.

People with dementia and their carers have time and again shown us their commitment to working and supporting policy, strategy and their communities, in order to ensure that their experiences drives improvements.

There is a common perception that human rights are abstract concepts which exist only in the domain of legal professionals and policy makers, with no bearing on real life. This is demonstrably untrue – we need everyone across the statutory, third and independent sectors to support involvement and engagement in a meaningful way. When given the opportunity, people with dementia and their carers are more than able and willing to exercise their human rights in affirming and meaningful way.”

Important: Opinions expressed by bloggers are their own and don’t represent those of the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations.

No evidence you can ‘catch’ Alzheimer’s disease #DAM2015 Day 13

Many in the media continue to write and therefore spread harmful and hurtful misrepresentations about dementia, stories about the causes, the very inaccurate ‘soon to be here’ cures, and most of the time, usually using offensive language.

For Day 13 of Dementia Awareness Month 2015, we thought we should talk about one such article, from last week. There has been a lot of confusion about a number of articles from last week, claiming you can catch Alzheimer’s Disease, so with their permission, I have added the easily understandable response from Alzheimer’s Scotland to this sensationalist and irresponsible journalism.

Screen Shot 2015-09-12 at 6.39.25 amToday’s story on ‘catching’ Alzheimer’s disease

 Published by Alzheimer’s Scotland on Thursday 10 September 2015

“A study was published today (in Nature) which stated that the protein beta-amyloid was found in the brains of eight people who had been who had previously injected with human growth hormone. It was suggested that these people would have therefore gone on to develop Alzheimer’s disease. The protein was observed in seven of the eight brains examined.

Some of today’s headlines have suggested that people can ‘catch’ Alzheimer’s disease, that it is in some way contagious, or that it can be caught through medical or surgical procedures. 

There is no evidence of this. 

Alzheimer Scotland are deeply disappointed by the sensationalist and irresponsible nature of much of today’s coverage.

While this study is interesting, it is far too small to draw any conclusions.

Go to their website to read the full response to this irresponsible journalism.

Editor: Kate Swaffer