Tag Archives: A More Inclusive Public Transport System by Emily Ong

A More Inclusive Public Transport System by Emily Ong

 

 

In 2021 we observe World Alzheimer’s Month #WAM also now referred to by many people and organisations as Dementia Awareness Month #DAM and World Dementia Month, by highlighting stories about, or written by our members, who all live with a diagnosis of dementia.

Today, we hear from board member Emily Ong from Singapore has written her second article of her personal experience of public transport in Singapore, which can easily be applied to public transport accessibility for people with dementia globally.  Her first article was about accessibility.

Thank you Emily, for your continued advocacy for all people living with dementia.

A More Inclusive Public Transport System in Singapore

By DAI board member and dementia advocate Mrs. Emily Ong

Image source: Emily Ong

Since the introduction of the Enabling Masterplan (2012-2016) in 2014 and ratification of the UN CRPD in 2013, the Singapore government has put in measures to improve the environmental accessibility and progressive removal of barriers to ensure full and effective participation of people living with disabilities in their social life and development, and one of which is the public transport system.

In 2019, Singapore was awarded The Asia-Pacific Special Recognition Award by the International Association of Public Transport (UITP), an international transit advocacy organization for its efforts in making the public transport system more inclusive.

The two efforts were;

  1. Heart Zones are designated areas for the elderly and visually disabled commuters at MRT stations and bus interchanges, and
  2. [email protected] which provides wheelchairs for the elderly commuters and those with physical difficulties.

Hence, I have been looking forward to the opening of new MRT stations along the Thomson-East Coast Line because it is a direct line from my place to my mum’s place in Woodlands. This would mean that I no longer need to change the MRT line which at times can be a cause of confusion for me because from Bishan to Woodlands is a different floor from Bishan to Marina Bay. We decided to take from Upper Thomas MRT station to Springleaf MRT station to have our breakfast on a Saturday morning.

Unfortunately, the second level of the escalator to the gantry area has this flashing light reflection on the escalator steps that are rushing towards you. It is like everything is moving but in opposite directions, making it hard to judge the steps and creating a very discomforting visual experience for me.

This can be potentially dangerous for people with photosensitive epilepsy as it might trigger a seizure if the escalator is moving fast during normal busy hours. It was the first thing that I informed the officer when I saw SMRT people inside the train. I am happy that my concern is heard and taken seriously.

 

This can be potentially dangerous for people with photosensitive epilepsy as it might trigger a seizure if the escalator is moving fast during normal busy hours. It was the first thing that I informed the officer when I saw SMRT people inside the train. I am happy that my concern is heard and taken seriously.

I am very pleased with the overall experience. The wayfinding signages are prominent positioned and big enough to read from a distance. Color contrast is heavily emphasized throughout from signages to platform seats.

 

And with the recent initiative – “May I have a seat please” lanyard & card, in April this year, which aim is to make rides more comfortable for those with invisible medical conditions such as have issues in maintaining their balance where there is jerking along the ride or with chronic pain arthritis are much applauded.

Singapore has come a long way in becoming more inclusive in the public transport system. As a consumer of public transport services and a dementia advocate, I would say, the application of the Universal Design concepts and principles has produced solutions that are functional, usable, and intuitive.

Another big contributing factor is the effort put in to collect feedback from commuters and the public engagement exercise where the public can share their views on the Land Transport Master Plan for 2040 and beyond. I hope that other mainstreaming accessibility issues will too have more and more participatory spaces to enable people with disabilities either born or acquired, visible or invisible, to have their voice heard and influence decision-making.

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