Patience by Rose Ong

DAI continues to observe World Alzheimer’s Month #WAM also now referred to by many people and organisations as Dementia Awareness Month #DAM and World Dementia Month, by highlighting stories about, or written by our members, who all live with a diagnosis of dementia.

Today, we are delighted to hear from Rose Ong who lives in Canada. Rose is a member of Dementia Alliance International (DAI), and a co-founder and member of The YODA Group, associated with Memory Lane Home Living, a Canadian charity advocating for the rights of dementia affected adults in our community. Thank you Rose.

Patience

A poem written by Rose Ong
on August 15, 2021

I know you think I’m crazy sometimes
And question my judgement
On every decision I make
But if you want to show me your support
Learn to accept me as I am,
With all my faults and errors
Don’t scold me like a child
Just cover for me and let me believe
In the patience found in Love

I remember when you were small
When you began to use the words
I would say, or words you heard others use
Most times they fit the context
Of what you wanted to say, but,
Occasionally, they were way off the mark
I would just smile and ask
“Do you know what ‘convoluted’ means?”
Your sheepish grin; another teachable moment

You say, now, that I should know better
When I burn toast at breakfast or forget
My lunch in the microwave or wake at noon
So many repetitive items are jumbled in my mind
And like you were once, I would ask for patience
Because I deserve your forbearance
Not only because I am your Mom or Nana
I am a human being; faulted and flawed
Sheepishly giving you a teachable moment

So when you think I’m crazy sometimes
And question my judgement
On every decision I make
If you want to show me your support
Learn to accept me as I am,
With all my faults and errors
Don’t scold me like a child
Just cover for me and let me believe
In the patience found in Love

Rose Ong

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