Hello, my name is Eileen Taylor

Eileen with her husband Dubhglas presenting at the STRiDE Workshop in London 2018

Following our #DAI #Hello my name is blog series for World Alzheimer’s Month #WAM2018, we are continuing with our stories, as we have many more than 30 to share with you.

September was an exceptional month for our members, some whom for the first ime, had been given a voice through these blogs.

Therefore, today, we feature DAI board member and secretary, Eileen Taylor from Australia. Eileen also co hosts the Monday Australian support group. She and her husband Dubhglas are also co founder of a local advocacy group in Brisbane, the Dementia Advocacy and Awareness Team (DAADT) . Thanks Eileen for sharing your story and for all you do for everyone with dementia.

I am still Eileen

Hello, my name is Eileen Taylor. I was diagnosed with Familial Younger Onset Alzheimer in 2009 aged 59. I was the same age my Dad when he was diagnosed with dementia back in the 1980’s. Both he and his brother in the UK died with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s in 1994.

Back then, Alzheimer’s wasn’t really discussed, and we didn’t know how to recognise the signs. My Dad struggled to focus and sometimes couldn’t remember what happened the day before. His doctor just put this down to being eccentric and told us there was nothing to really worry about.

Throughout his long and distressing struggle with dementia, my Dad regretfully was never told the truth about his illness.

While I am now trying to live well with dementia, it was very different when I was first diagnosed in 2009. Then, I noticed I was becoming a little forgetful, but it was nothing too major. I didn’t really take too much notice until one day I saw a documentary on TV about the genetic link to dementia.

Because of what had happened to my Dad, I thought that I needed to know, so I had a genetic test to find out the truth. Not just for myself, but for my two sons and my grandkids too – I thought they had right to know if the gene was in our family.

At first the doctor didn’t think there was any reason to know, after all I was below the age when most people start to show symptoms. But I pushed for it, and I’m glad I did, because it enabled me to catch it early and to be a part of several clinical trials to find answers.

When the results of my genetic test and other assessments revealed that I did in fact have the gene and had Alzheimer’s, the news was initially “mind-blowing”. I was devastated, it was a “surely not me!” moment. I was only 59. It was the worst thing to happen to me. It was at that moment when I actually felt the pain in my chest after hearing news that broke my heart. On reflection it was like:

“Imagining you wake up one morning and your computer has been switched from a PC to a Mac, and the keyboard is suddenly Azerty. You are now trying to write a paper with that, while your hands are cuffed together, and your head is in a bucket of Jelly.”

Nevertheless, after my diagnosis, I chose to engage in, not give in, but to fight for a cure and to support other people as well as their families living with dementia. I was determined not to remain silent (as what had happened with my Dad) but to speak out and talk to people and help them to understand what it is like to live with dementia.

Parallel to the trials, the Dementia Alliance International (DAI) became my lifeline, an oasis in a sea of medical denial and indifference I had seen from some health professionals. It gave me a voice to speak out and I was accepted unconditionally into the group I joined.

Now, thankfully, I am a part of the DAI Board, serving as their Secretary, Advocate and on-line support group facilitator for the Australian and New Zealand people.

I am also an advocate and co-founder with the Dementia Awareness Advocacy Team (DAAT), as well as an advocate and active participant with Dementia Australia (DA) and serve on several dementia committees.

Doug, my husband has supported and helped me to live positively with my dementia by externalizing it.

I am not the problem, the problem is the problem, and in my case it’s Alzheimer’s dementia.

My dementia externalized is; my “Dark Cloud!” It helps me come to terms, that I am not my Dementia, my Dementia is my Dementia, I am still Eileen.

Eileen Taylor © 2018

DAI’s vision: “A World where people with dementia are fully valued and included.”

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