Category Archives: Younger Onset Dementia

Hello, my name is Jerry Wylie

On the final Day of the #DAI #Hello my name is blog series for World Alzheimer’s Month #WAM2018, we feature Jerry Wylie, DAI’s Vice Chair and an advocate from Philomath, Oregon, in the USA. Jerry is a committed and very active board member, and supports two of our peer to peer support groups, as well as co-hosting our Action Group and wekly Brain Health Meetings.

Thank you Jerry, from everyone, for saying hello again here to support this series, and for all that you do for DAI and others. Jerry has also set up a local face to face support group where he lives, which now has more than 20 members. We are very proud of him, and grateful for his hard work. This is his story.

It is a matter of our Civil Rights

DAI & Jerry Wylie © 2018

DAI’s vision: “A World where people with dementia are fully valued and included.”

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Hello, my name is Veda Meneghetti

Image source: Accolade 2nd Dementia Summit

It’s almost the end of World Alzheimer’s Month, and we have been sharing our #DAI daily members #Hello is stories. In fact, there are so many in our draft folder, we will be continuing them well beyond #WAM2018. These stories have helped raise awareness not only of dementia, but of the unique and individual experiences each person has with a diagnosis of any type of dementia.

Today, we share  Veda Meneghetti’s story, who was supported by her partner Lynda. DAI member Mike Belleville produced the video which shares some of Veda’s beautiful photographs, with her own music, and an overlay of her story, also copied below. Thank you Veda, and also Lynda and Mike for todays blog.

“Hello, I’m Veda Meneghetti. I was born in Adelaide, Australia to an Italian migrant father and an Australian mother. I got called “Veda Spaghetti” at school.

I hated school, but I was a “cool” teenager.  My mother worked in a department store so I always had great clothes. My dad was a stonemason who worked in marble. He kept a wonderful vegetable & fruit garden and I had animals around me….I love animals.

I liked art but hated everything else and left school at 15. They’d made me feel stupid -I didn’t know I was dyslexic till 50 years later. I taught myself to read & write well, but I can’t read a music score.

I’d been playing guitar & singing since I was 10. I went on TV for a young talent time thing & then became lead vocalist for a couple of Adelaide bands. We started touring in Australia and then went overseas when I was 21. I met up with a girls’ band and continued to work with them as resident musicians in Asia, Africa and Europe. We came back to Australia when I was 27 and became the Party Girls band. We toured a lot, made an album ourselves, appeared on TV and wrote a lot of our own music. In 1985 we were the only girls band to kick off the Australian leg of the 1st. world simulcast, Aids for Africa. I did lead vocals and rhythm guitar.

When the band split up I started my own band, Safari, which played regularly in Sydney in the 90s. I kept on writing songs though I retired from performing. My last 4 songs were recorded in 2010.

In 2012 I was diagnosed with Primary Progressive Aphasia (logopenic). I’m losing language so my partner Lynda is writing this for me. I can’t read or type/write anymore, but I understand.

I joined DAI after I met Kate Swaffer. We did a presentation together in Kiama for Dementia Awareness Month 2014. Lynda and I became members of the Kiama Dementia Friendly Community Advisory Group, the #KiamaDAGs. We get together socially with other people living with dementia in our region, run community education workshops and sometimes do media coverage for the project.  Lynda and I have presented at a few conferences, using my songs and our photos. We’ve made a lot of new friends who have dementia. We still get involved in research. I’m not ashamed to say that I have dementia – people need to know what it’s like.

I just want to live in peace. I’m happy living two hours from Sydney – it’s beautiful here. We go back to the city now & then to visit friends, because now most people have stopped visiting us.”

Veda Meneghetti © 2018

DAI’s vision: “A World where people with dementia are fully valued and included.”

Help us support people such as Veda. Become a DAI Sponsor or Associate today.

Hello, my name is Wally Cox

On Day 27 of our #DAI #Hello my name is blog series for World Alzheimer’s Month #WAM2018, we feature DAI member and advocate, Wally Cox. Wally is an active advocate and DAI member, and co hosts one of our USA support group. Wally also featured in our online Art Exhibition just a few hours ago! Thanks Wally for sharing your story by saying hello here, and for all that you do for DAI and others.

DAI and Wally Cox © 2018

DAI’s vision: “A World where people with dementia are fully valued and included.”

Help us support people such as Wally. Become a DAI Sponsor or Associate today.

Hello, my name is Nina Baláčková

Nina (right) and Eva at the Memory Walk adter the 2013 ADI conference in Taiwan. Image source: Kate Swaffer

On Day 20 of the #DAI #WAM2017 #Hello my name is blog series, we share long time DAI member and friend from the Czech Republic, Nina Baláčková’s story. Through their personal stories, our members want to raise awareness of dementia, and to highlight that each persons lived exerience of dementia is highly individual.

By speaking out, people with dementia are individually and collectively increasing the worlds understanding of living with dementia, and also hope to break down the stigma, myths and discrimination still being experienced. Thank you Nina for allowing us to share your story here.

Raising awareness and finding humour

Hello, my name is Nina Baláčková. I am from the Czech Republic. I am proud to be a member of DAI for several years.

I was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s (Young onset) in 2007 at the age of 49. It took me several months to accept this disease. When I realized that my life can continue, though in another  more difficult form, I decided to enjoy every day I will be here, on the earth, with my family.

We did not know about Alzheimer’s during my mom’s lifetime. Only after her death did the doctor tell me that she had the last stage of Alzheimer’s. It was one of the reasons why I decided to speak up about dementia.

I wish to raise awareness of dementia for many people. So, in 2009 I started to organize discussions named My life with Mr. Alzheimer.

Then I became a member of European Working Group of People with Dementia (EWGPWD), and It has been my pleasure to work with this group of dedicated advocates. I very recently stepped down as a member of the EWGPWD. I am also grateful I was able to speak on the ADI conference in Taipei. 

Thanks to my family, to my strong will and strong faith, support of my church and many friends I have been fighting Mr. Alzheimer persistently for 11 years.

Even though after my husband had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s last year, it has been very difficult, we still try to enjoy our lives.

The Potato Soup 
Given my lack of taste, smell, poor estimate of the time, distance and quantity, cooking is becoming quite an adventurous matter for me. And I did not even mention the forgetfulness. One autumn day a few years ago I decided to cook potato soup. After the vegetables was ready, peeled, scraped and cut up, I prepared a nice dark roux. Mushrooms, thanks to my daughter, I also had enough. I guessed that I had something missing. But hat was it? Garlic? Marjoram?

That day my friend Eva came to visit us. The soup seemed to look pretty good and was nice and thick. As my friend appeared, I immediately gave her a taste to find out whether it is necessary to add more garlic, salt or marjoram.
My husband, my friend Eva and I, we had a dinner together.

When my husband almost finished, he innocently remarked that it just did not have any potatoes. I thought for a long time and then burst out laughing: “Well, you could not find it, because I forgot to put potatoes in it” . For a long time we were laughing with my friend: potato soup without potatoes ….

Nina Baláčková © 2018 

DAI’s vision is “A World where people with dementia are fully valued and included.”

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Hello, my name is Roger Marple

Wow, it is more than half was through the #DAI #Hello my name is World Alzheimer’s Month series! Our members stories have been really well received, and we thank them for sharing them, and especially want to thank you for reading and watching them.  On Day 18 of #WAM2018, we are proud to share the story of one of our Canadian members, Roger Marple. Thank you Roger for taking the time to write it and allowing us to share it here.

Still living well with dementia

Image source: Roger Marple

I was diagnosed with younger onset dementia, more specifically, Alzheimer’s disease in 2015.  I am happy to say I am still living well with dementia in my life.

I find as time as time goes on, seeing thousands of people worldwide still living well with dementia despite any challenges they may experience, gives me hope for continuing to live well with this disease.

Often, I speak about what hope and living well looks like with dementia. I have been accused by people in public media for “sugar coating” this disease. They always make it a point to remind me this is a terminal disease and the inevitable outcome is death. I’ve been accused by people for spreading false hope. To those people I want to say, I do not have an ego so large to think I can beat this disease. To all of those people I acknowledge this disease has a 100% mortality rate. I’m a realist; I know the outcome of this disease.

Now that I have that out of the way I want to share some comments made on twitter from people regarding a discussion about dementia:

Tom Harrington‏ Verified account @cbctom

Tom Harrington Retweeted Roger Marple

My latest follow. A courageous Canadian who’s discussing his experience with #Alzheimers. We need this. Please RT, follow & learn. #ENDAlz

This comment was made by Tom Harrington. Tom is the host of a very popular CBC radio news show in Canada called The World this Hour. I must say I like him and I am enjoying his comments and views on twitter.  Tom is no stranger to dementia in his life. Both of his parents had a form of dementia. I thought it was nice of him to mention me. I agree with Tom, we need more people to understand dementia in our communities.

He was responding to a comment that I had made on Twitter:

@rogerdoger991

Roger Marple Retweeted Sophie Leggett

Alzheimer’s isn’t the end. We all live with this terminal condition called life. Although dementia is different for everyone, it is not uncommon to live well with this disease and enjoy life for some time to come. Something I do every day…

And to Tom’s and my comments another person responded with this:

Replying to @cbctom

But Alzheimers always gets worse once it begins, never better. Don’t give people false hope.

When I read this comment, I wasn’t surprised. In fact I have learnt to expect this.  People have said comments such as this often to me. This person who read Tom’s and my comments only got one thing out of this. Bottom line, things are going to get worse with dementia and there is no hope.

I thought I would do a role reversal with this person’s comment.  Instead of using the word Alzheimer’s in the sentence, let’s insert another terminal condition called life. Now let’s look at this sentence.

But life always gets worse once it begins, never gets better. Don’t give people false hope.

There might be some logic to this comment; eventually things will get worse with this terminal condition called life. Having said that, is that a reason not to have hope living with this terminal condition?

Often I see jokes about Alzheimer’s. I see derogatory comments. This is one of many faces of stigma with dementia.   If you are not sure what I mean by this I encourage you to Google “Alzheimer’s jokes”. You will find hundreds of them not to mention many websites with more jokes on them with dementia/Alzheimer’s.

When I look for jokes about other serious diseases in our society like ALS or cancer, I cannot find any. It is just not okay to joke about these conditions, and usually, if we hear of a joke about this, people are furious at comments made. So I pose the question, why is it fair game for people to make fun of people with a form of dementia? Why can’t people see how fundamentally wrong this is?

What if the role was reversed? What if people with dementia posted thousands of jokes poking fun at your weakest points you may experience living with your terminal condition called life? What if thousands of people shared jokes about you and the challenges you may experience on public media, like Facebook, or in your community? What if you opened a birthday card with a joke about your struggles? Alzheimer’s for example.

Would you feel like crawling under a rock and hiding your challenges from the masses making fun of you and not engaging in life to the fullest, regardless of your challenges? Often this is the case for people living with dementia and our loved ones who live with this disease as much as we do. I see it all the time.

As a person living with dementia, here is a promise I will make to all of you. I promise I will not make fun of any challenges you may have with your terminal condition called life. I will see who you are regardless of any challenges you may have.  I will recognize and support you to live your life to the fullest regardless of challenges you have. I promise to recognize what hope looks like for you living your life to the fullest, with the time you have left, so you can live a good quality life. And most of all, I will respect who you are.

My hope is that someday all of us will recognize people with a terminal diagnosis of dementia, and people with a terminal condition called life, that both groups have the same hopes and dreams. Perhaps with time we can walk in each other’s shoes and have a better understanding for each other. People with dementia want to live a full life for as long as we can — just as we all do. We may have to work a little harder at it that’s all. We are all the same my friends.

I have a philosophy in life. I show my utmost respect to everyone I meet. Would it be too much to ask for the same in return?

By the way, Tom Harrington had a response to this person’s comments about “false hope” with dementia:

Tom Harrington

@cbctom

Replying to: This isn’t false hope. I lost both my parents to it. This is about an act of courage and awareness. It’s the cancer of the 21st century and we need to focus on it more.

Tom made some good points here. He understands the need for greater understanding of dementia. He knows what dementia in his life looks like. There is something to be said about lived experience.  At the end of the day it will be understanding that will eliminate the stigma that we have to endure living with dementia. As far as the courage part? I look forward to the day when courage is not needed when speaking about our journey with dementia.

Last but not least, all who live with dementia in your lives know this. One person by the name of Naquib Mabfouz said “Fear doesn’t prevent death. It prevents life” Please do not let fear from stigma get in the way of living well with dementia.  The problem is with the person perpetuating the stigma, not you. Remember that.

As I said, my name is Roger. I live well with dementia. My hopes and dreams in life have not changed.

Roger Marple © 2018
@rogerdoger991

DAI’s vision is “A World where people with dementia are fully valued and included.”

Help us support people such as Roger. Become a DAI Sponsor or Associate today.

Hello, my name is George Chong K.L.

On Day 16 of the #DAI #Hello my name is series for #WAM2018, we are featuring a short story and  video about one of our members in Singapore. The Alzheimer’s Disease Association Singapore has been working hard towards empowering and developing people with dementia to become self advocates, and also to set up their own Dementia Working Group next year. DAI is delighted to support them, and to be able to share part of George’s story with you today…

There is no cure

Hello, my name-George Chong K.L. At the age of 46, I went through my first investigation for dementia in April 2016, and was diagnosed with Brain Atrophy through MRI, and advised it was Mild Cognitive Impairment. In January 2017 I sought a second opinion, and in April 2017 had further investigations including a Pet Scan and Lumber Puncture.

The diagnosis was Younger Onset Alzheimer’s Disease. Like many, I was not thrilled with the diagnosis, so I decided to get a third opinion which ended in the same conclusions. I was prescribed with Echelon Patches in September 2018. I learned about DAI though meeting Kate Swaffer, when she came to Singapore in 2017 as a guest of the Alzheimer’s Disease Association here, and since then am probably considered Singapore’s first self advocate! 

As there is no cure, and no disease modifying drugs, I use a number of holistic remedies which include the following:

  • Ketogenic Diet
  • Meditation 
  • Acupuncture
  • Yoga
  • Qigong
  • Coloring in Puzzle
  • Playing frisbee 
  • Light walking or running

The disabilities I experience caused by my dementia include losing the ability to do mathematical calculations, understand instructions and logic, my verbal expression, memory loss, and sometimes frustration and even anger. Living with changing abilities and losing what used to be automatic and easy functioning is very difficult to get used to, and therefore easy to feel upset about.  However, my wife Lyn and I continue to face dementia together, as best we can.

The following short film was made this year to raise awareness of dementa in Singapore, and about my experiences [apologies we have not been able to embed it, so please follow the link].

Talking Point 2018 – EP7 Thu 31 May 2018 – Am I At Risk Of Dementia?

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Hello, my name is Phyllis Fehr

On Day 14 of the #DAI #WAM2018 #Hello my name is blog series, we feature DAI Board member Phyllis Fehr from Canada. This series is about raising awareness of the many lived experiences of dementia, and highlighting the challenges, as well as the reality that so many people continue to live positive and very productive lives even when diangosed with dementia. Thank you Phyllis for sharing your personal story, and all that you are doing for DAI and with your colleagues in Canada.

I AM STILL ME

Hello. My name is Phyllis Fehr. I worked as an ICU RN until I developed younger-onset dementia.  At the age of 48, I started to see some typical early signs, such as misplacing things and forgetting appointments.

It wasn’t till I was 53 that I received a firm diagnosis, after going through a two-day battery of testing.

I will never forget that day or maybe I will, but I feel like it has been branded in my head. You see on that day we were escorted into the gerontologist’s office. Once she entered the office, I felt like I no longer existed. She looked at my husband and spoke to my husband. As far as she was concerned, I was not there. She told him that I had “early”-onset Alzheimer’s and that I was still doing well. She instructed him to bring me back when I couldn’t dress myself.

I couldn’t say a word! I was in shock. First, I’d been given a diagnosis of a terminal disease. Yes, I was a health professional and aware. Yes, I was ready to hear the diagnosis.

But she treated me with disrespect. She ignored me. One day, I’m functioning and the next moment, I am diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and have immediately lost all capacity? That experience really bothered me. It left a disabling affect on my being.

So, I requested my neurologist to refer me to someone else.

For nine months, while I waited, I became with drawn. I did not want to be Involved. That first gerontologist, left a disabling impression upon my being. I lost all confidence in knowing anything. She actually broke my will to continue on.

The referral took a while, but it was worth my wait. This new doctor, spoke to ME.

She seemed to understand what I was going through. She supported me and encouraged me. This made a world of difference to how I thought about dementia. She gave me back my person hood, she gave me back my will to go on, she turned me into the person you see today, the person who goes out and advocates for dementia, advocates for change. I have regained my voice; I have regained my confidence. I am involved again, not just in advocacy and public speaking, I’m involved in research, I am a test subject and I am a researcher. It may be hard for me but I can still do it. I sit on a group called the voices group, we help research from our lived experiences and we are respected.

When I joined Dementia Alliance International, I became stronger. This is due to the support we have for each other, online support groups and the educational events they offer. Just being able to see others with the same disease process, doing well, gives me hope and makes me want to change things in the world to help all people who are living with dementia. On 30-31 October 2017, I was pleased to represent DAI at the NCD Alliance workshop: “Our Views Our Voices” in Geneva.

When Canada reported on the CRPD, I also attended the United Nations as part of their civil delegation. I work within Canada along with the government relations’ officer from the Alzheimer’s society to push forward human rights for people living with dementia in Canada.

The Alzheimer’s society of Canada has work very hard with their Advisory board of people living with dementia to put together a Canadian Charter of Rights for people living with dementia. I was able to have a look and give feedback to this group.

I would encourage you to have a look and hear the stories of some of the people who were involved.

You can download the Charter of Rights here…

Today I realize I still have my intelligence. I just need to access it, differently. I still have all my educational experience. I am still ME.

Phyllis Fehr © 2018

DAI’s vision is “A World where people with dementia are fully valued and included.”

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Hello, my name is Jeff Borghoff

On Day 12 of the #DAI #WAM2018 #Hello my name is blog series, we feature new DAI member Jeff Borghoff from the US. This series is not only about raising awareness of the many lived experiences of dementia, it is highlighting the challenges, as well as the reality that so many people continue to live positive lives, alongside dementia. Thank you Jeff for allowing us to share your story; everyone at DAI, and the global dementia communtiy is helped and educated through you inviting us into you and your family’s world.

Dementia does not define me

Image source: Jeff Berghoff

Hello, my name if Jeff Borghoff, and with my wife Kim, we reside in Forked River, New Jersey with our three children. I was diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2016 at age 51. During my career, I was a software architect and developer responsible for the design, implementation and project management of technical solutions to help companies solve document-intensive business challenges.

Several years prior to the diagnosis, I experienced changes in my ability to recall information. Although my spouse, Kim was noticing these difficulties at home, the issues were predominant in my professional life where I experienced increasing difficulty with problem solving, managing tasks and providing appropriate supervision to his team.  Therefore, I approached my management team and asked for an alternate position with less responsibility. However, even in this new role, I still found it difficult to manage my duties.

Shortly thereafter, I experienced a serious stomach virus which led to a brief hospitalization. A series of physical neurological symptoms, including facial twitches soon followed which resulted in multiple visits to specialists, and I was still experiencing changes in my memory, but also began to notice differences in my balance and speech. After six months of testing, which included CT, scans, MRIs, spinal taps and neuropsychological evaluations, I was diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease. My father is also living with the disease.

Kim was the first person to receive the news of my diagnosis. She immediately called me and we met to discuss the diagnosis at a nearby park. Although I had been anticipating a serious diagnosis and researching Alzheimer’s disease extensively, I was still stunned and saddened by the news. Together, we went back to meet with the neurologist to discuss next steps, including planning for the future.

Together, we decided to share the diagnosis immediately with our three children. Their reactions ranged from devastation to anger and sorrow. After sharing the diagnosis with others, we have found most to be sympathetic, but often surprised that someone of my age could be diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

We began planning for the future by meeting with an attorney and making legal and financial plans, including powers of attorney and applying for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). We also scaled back on our spending and invited my parents to live in a converted two-car garage in-law suite. My parents are also helping to pay off the home mortgage as they prepare for their future cost of living.

After finding the Alzheimer’s Association online, together with my family we created our “Walk To Remember” Walk To End Alzheimer’s team to raise funds for the Alzheimer’s Association.  I also enrolled in the Medic Alert + Alzheimer’s Association Safe Return® program and am enrolled in a clinical trial through the Alzheimer’s Association TrialMatch®.

As a participant in the Alzheimer’s Association 2016 National Early-Stage Advisory Group and Early-Stage Ambassador for the Delaware Valley and Greater NJ chapters, I help raise awareness of younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease and the value of early detection and diagnosis.

“I am not letting this disease define who I am and what I do on a daily basis. I am doing everything I can to raise awareness.”

Copyright 2018: Jeff Borghoff, Living with Alzheimer’s Disease

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Jeff joined DAI this year,  and is involved in many other organisations and personal things, including managing his own website.

– Alzheimer’s Association National Early-Stage Advisory Group
– Early-Stage Ambassador – Delaware Valley & Greater NJ Early Stage Advisory Council
– Alzheimer’s Congressional Team (ACT) Member

Hello, my name is Jennnifer Bute

On day nine of DAI’s World Alzheimer’s Month #WAM2018 series of #Hello my name is blogs, we share one of our UK members stories of living well with dementia. Thank you Jennifer for allowing DAI to publish this during September to help us raise awareness of dementia, and the fact that so many people can live positively with it.

Jennifer has represented DAI twice this year, giving presentions at the ADI Alzheimer’s University in London, and the photo we have added here was taken last week. See this tweet thread to read how well her presentation was received.

A Glorious Opportunity

Image source: ADI 2018

Dr Jennifer Bute, Fellow of the Royal College of General Physicians, lives in Somerset in a Dementia friendly village.

Jennifer worked in Africa as a Doctor before working as a GP for 25 years also training medical students and Doctors. She resigned as a GP 12 years ago as she knew things were not right and was diagnosed 9 years ago with Alzheimer’s Dementia. This is her story.

I now know illness can precipitate dementia but I did not realise that in August 2004 when I had a ‘mini stroke’ I lost the use of my left arm and was sent to the TIA clinic. I continued working but began to get seriously lost when visiting patients so I just bought a satnav eventually needing it to find my way to our branch surgery or even to get home.

In January 2005 I had a bizarre episode when I did not know what to do with my shopping in the supermarket and this alarmed me sufficiently to return to my GP who referred me to a neurologist who said there was nothing the matter with me implying  I was attention seeking when I said I did not recognise friends and neighbours . I decided to find more ways to cover up problems and remain safe. Later I had a gas leak check done on our house and the drains checked at work not realising I was having olfactory hallucinations. I could no longer lecture from memory so I started using Power Point Presentations to help.

My defining moment came at the end of 2005 when I was chairing an important Case conference at work, I did not recognise colleagues I had known for 20 years and persisted asking them who they were and why they were there. So in 2006 I agreed to see a 2nd neurologist who was surprised I had had no investigations. The neuropsychology consultant said I did indeed have problems and was not sure I was or would remain safe professionally My patients and high standards were paramount so I resigned. The neurologist said the abnormal results were of no significance.

By January 2008, I developed auditory/visual hallucinations hearing children screaming babies crying and was seen conducting conversations with non-present people I wrote myself detailed instructions on how to make a cup of tea, put washing powder in the washing machine I would have to be reminded to cook meals and might cook supper twice on the same day. One day I did not recognise my husband. I knew I had dementia.

In 2009 the 2nd neurologist was very annoyed I had resigned from work. I could no longer read easily and when the insurance company spoke to me on the phone I thought they were speaking Chinese. I had another neuropsychological assessment and it was such a relief when it was explained I used non verbal and contextual clues to work things out my intelligence enabled me to cover up and was sent to Peter Garrad whom I found on the internet had done work on Iris Murdoch and Harold Wilson so when he told me in 2009 I had Younger Onset Alzheimer’s I was just so relieved.

He started me on Aricept which caused terrible nightmares but we found ways of coping and later Memantine, within 3 months my family were amazed at my improvement I am able to talk (unless tired) most of my hallucinations went. Although they have now returned and often shake my sense of reality However I passionately believe there are ways round problems and we can even reverse some of the decline.

I have started a memory group for folk where I live based on the Japanese model of using the three R’s (Reading Writing and Arithmetic) with amazing results.

The spiritual never dies I have no fear of the future I know exactly what lies ahead.

For me my Dementia is an unexpected gift, a wonderful opportunity and great privilege.

My husband was a great supporter until he died unexpectedly 7 years ago but I have a wonderful family, 3 married children in various parts of the world My networked computer is my back up brain I can’t manage the phone but I can do emails and Facebook as they have visual clues.

My father had dementia so I understand a carers perspective too Where I now live there are many who walk this path and I am always learning and finding new ways to also help others cope.  My son  set up my website gloriousopportunity.org and makes my educative films which are all available there to anyone.

There are no rainbows without rain!

Jennifer Bute © 2018

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Hello, my name is Maria Turner

On day eight of DAI’s World Alzheimer’s Month #WAM2018 series of #Hello my name is blogs, we share one of our USA members stories of living with dementia, and the presentation she made on Day two of the ADI confernce recently with her amazing son Rhys Dalton.

Thank you Maria and Rhys for allowing DAI to publish this during September to help us raise awareness. Together with Rhy’s fiance Kayla, you are an awesome team, and we love and are inspired daily by you all.

This is an example of Maria using her voice. Their full speech notes are available here…

Mother and Son: The Impact of Younger Onset Dementia (YOD)

Dementia Alliance International, Maria Turner & Rhys Dalton © 2018

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