Category Archives: Rehabilitation

World Alzheimers Month DAI Webinar Series

World Alzheimer’s Month 2021 #WAM2021,  also known in some countries as Dementia Awareness Month #DAM or Dementia Action Week #DAW is almost here!

Lets’s all work together to make a difference.
#Collaborate #Cooperate #WorkingTogether

This year DAI has planned a series of webinars specifically focused on rehabilitation for dementia. We have done this, as people with dementia have been campaigning for the full suite of rehabilitative interventions for decades, and at last, we appear to be seeing small actions towards actually achieving this.

Last year, Professor Lee-Fay Low and A/Professor Kate Laver edited a book on Rehabilitaiton for Dementia. This year, the World Health Organisation has been working on their own Rehabilitation for Dementia Guidelines, so there is hope it will eventually make it into mainstream clinical and care practice.

Rehabilitation and Dementia #DAI Webinar Series 2021

  1. Webinar 1: Rehabilitation to maintain physical function, presented by A/Prof Michele Callisaya and Dr Morag Taylor
  2. Webinar 2: Living life to the full: rehabilitation of daily activities and leisure for people with dementia, presented by Associate Professor Kate Laver and Doctor Claire O’Connor
  3. Webinar 3: Cognition-oriented treatments for people with dementia, presented by Dr Alex Bahar-Fuchs and Dr Loren Mowszowski
  4. Webinar 4 Panel Session: The Importance of Rehabilitation for all People with Dementia, with panellists includng Professor Lee-Fay Low, PhD, Emily Ong, Lynette Rogers and Kate Swaffer

Rehabilitation for all people with dementia is a basic human right, and in this series, DAI aims to highlight why.

REMINDER

Reminder to register for the two webinars this coming week too, both very important sessions exploring new ways of managing dementia.

  1. How to make Alzheimer’s a rare Disease!, by Professor Dale Bredesen, M.D.
  2. Updates In Precision Medicine and Protocols for MCI & Dementia, by Dr Nate Bergman DO, MBA

Dementia and Rehabilitation by Emily Tan Tan Ong

We are pleased to publish the following article written by DAI member Emily Tan Tan Ong on Dementia and Rehabilitation, or rather, the lack of rehabilitation for people with dementia.

Emily mentions in her article that rehabilitation for dementia is not heard of in her country; most other DAI members also report it is unheard of in their countries.

As our CEO Kate Swaffer says: “If we are afforded rehabilitation after a stroke or other brain injury or medical condition, then we have the same right to be after a diagnosis of dementia. It won’t be a cure, and may not even slow the progression, but rehabilition does improve quality of life.”

I keep the patients alive. Rehabilitation gives them Quality of Life. 

(Dr. Tagio Tumas, Ministry of Health, WHO Rehabilitation 2030 Forum, Geneva, July 2019).

Dementia and Rehabilitation, by Emily Tan Tan Ong

With no means to significantly modify the progression of dementia and no cure in the foreseeable future, the rehabilitation approach is an integral part of living positively with dementia.

Rehabilitation, in its essence, is a set of interventions needed when a person is experiencing limitations in everyday physical, mental, and social functioning due to aging or a health condition, including chronic diseases or disorders, injuries, or trauma [1]. It is estimated that at least 1 in 3 people in the world are living with a health condition that would benefit from rehabilitation [2].

Despite this, rehabilitation has not been prioritized and is under-resourced globally.

A possible explanation could be rehabilitation is often perceived as an expensive and specialized service provided at the secondary care level and needed by those recovering from injury or stroke. Hence, the perception that rehabilitation is a luxury health service in addition to primary health care has caused it to be undervalued and ignored when competing demands for resources and investments.

As a result, people living with terminal, progressive health conditions like dementia, which require long-term rehabilitation services, are left behind when rehabilitation is not part of or accessible at the primary health care level.

Earlier on in my journey living with dementia, I was having difficulties with some of the everyday functioning. I was confused at the public transport interchange, overwhelmed with sequential tasks like cooking and baking, and not able to remember the content of the paragraph I just read.

It is like saying, “Sorry too bad you are diagnosed with dementia but there is nothing we can help you to continue living other than attending Adult Day Care Center or Memories Cafe.  One is told that is the way life is going to be, living with dementia, losing one’s functional and cognitive abilities, and independence.

Hence, it is not surprising many newly diagnosed with young-onset dementia go into depression. It is emotionally tormenting to be alive and not able to do things when you still have insights into who you are, what you value, and how you want to live despite dementia.

Rehabilitation in dementia is unheard of in this part of the world where I live.

The” ESTEEM” cognitive rehabilitation program, a partnership between the National Neuro Institute and the Singapore Alzheimer Disease Association is available to individuals diagnosed with moderate young-onset dementia. Hence, I was left unsupported to cope with my cognitive impairment when Cognitive Rehabilitation (CR) interventions would have helped to ease in transitioning my life to the ‘new normal’ with dementia in a more positive and encouraging light.

I came across the GREAT Cognitive Rehabilitation project of Professor Linda Clare from the University of Exeter when looking for ways to self-help myself.

The program uses a goal-oriented approach to enable people living with mild to moderate dementia to “function optimally in the context of their intrinsic capacity and current health state” [3].

However, the GREAT project is delivered by trained therapists who then work together with each individual to formulate meaningful and intrinsically motivated goals that are realistic and potentially achievable. The drawback is that not everyone can access trained cognitive rehabilitation therapists.

The training materials available are for therapists specializing in cognitive rehabilitation. The content was wordy and conceptual, but I am determined to translate whatever information I could obtain into a self-help Cognitive Rehabilitation strategy. I took ages to read, comprehend the principles, and come out with ways to maintain or regain, or in some cases, compensate for my declining functional ability. It was the best thing I have done to sustain my independence and continue living the life I want. Three years down the road with dementia, I still cook, bake, and enjoy reading. I found that the Cognitive Rehabilitation strategies have enabled me to become stronger in areas I didn’t even consider would be possible. I learned to make bread at home, I regained my ability to use a laptop, and more apt at making Powerpoint slides. The best of all, I conquered my inadequacy and incompetency in writing. I now love to write for my blog.

I want to appeal to policymakers to acknowledge the rights of people living with dementia to rehabilitation services and make it part of the primary healthcare system. It is without a doubt that creating an accessible, dementia-friendly neighborhood help to remove external barriers to participation it is even more crucial to enable people living with dementia to participate in everyday life in a manner that is meaningful and purposeful to them. In this way, it also helps to dispel the public perception of incapacity in dementia.

References:

[1] Cieza A. Rehabilitation the health strategy of the 21st century. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2019; 100: 2212-2214

[2] Cieza A. et al.. Global estimates of the need for rehabilitation based on the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. Lancet. 2020; 396: 2006-2017

[3] Clare L (2017) Rehabilitation for people living with dementia: A practical framework of positive support. PLoS Med 14(3): e1002245. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002245

Ps. Don’t forget to register for our next “Meeting Of The Minds” Webinar, Disrupted! Resiliently Reintegrating After Stress & Adversity by Dr Kozhi Sidney Makai.

Assoc. Professor James McLoughlin presents here on rehabilitation and dementia at a DAI Webinar hosted in 2016. It is still a hard sell!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Health Day 2021

World Health Organisation – World Health Day 2021

On April 7 each year, DAI joins the world in observing World Health Day. The theme in 2021 is Building a fairer, healthier world.

We must end discrimination and exclusion.

As COVID-19 has highlighted, some people live healthier lives with better access to health services than other people. These differences are entirely due to the conditions in which they are born, grow, live, work, and age. However, they can also be due to stigma, discrimination, economic status, and other factors such as disability or a disease, such as dementia.

All over the world, people struggle financially, which the pandemic has exacerbated. Some groups struggle with little or no daily income, inadequate housing conditions, poor educational and employment opportunities, gender inequality, age and disability discrimination. They also have little to no access to clean water and air, nutritious food, or health services.

This harms our societies and economies, leading to unnecessary distress, avoidable illnesses, and premature death.

DAI represents the more than 50 million people currently living with dementia. Nearly 60% live in low and middle income countries.

COVID-19 has affected all countries hard, but its impact has been harshest on those communities that were already vulnerable, especially people living with dementia and other disabilities.

Everyone impacted by dementia receives little if any health care. This includes lack of diagnostic support and inadequate support for living with dementia once diagnosed, with interventions such as rehabilitation.

From increased isolation to systemic human and disability rights violations, people with dementia have disproportionately experienced the adverse effects of measures implemented to contain the pandemic.

This is where DAI comes in…

During the pandemic, DAI increased the number of freely available services for people living with dementia by providing even more free, online support groups and other activities for our members in 49 countries. DAI has also continued our global efforts on claiming the human and disability rights for all people with dementia through our international advocacy and policy work.

In recognition of World Health Day, Dementia Alliance International commits to continuing to build a fairer, healthier world.

We will continue to call on leaders to monitor inequalities experienced by people with dementia and our families, and will work towards ensuring that all are able to access quality health services.

As a registered non-profit charity, we rely on the support of people like you. Your donation will help us to provide free online peer to peer support groups for people living with dementia, virtual cafes, and educational webinars, as well as other opportunities for families, care partners, and the wider dementia community.

DAI’s vision is a world where all people are valued and included.

If you do too, please consider becoming a regular supporter of Dementia Alliance International.

Every dollar makes a difference in the life of someone living with a diagnosis of dementia!

We are appealing to you to donate to DAI today.

Thank you.

 

You are invited to DAI’s 7th birthday Cafe

You are invited to the January 2021 virtual DAI Cafe Le Brain to help us celebrate 7 years of DAI’s advocacy and progress.

DAI Celebrates 7 Years

Hosts: Christine Thelker, Wally Cox and Kate Swaffer

Speakers include: Mr John Sandblom, Co founder and Treasurer, Dementia Alliance International, Mr Glenn Rees, Chair, Alzheimers Disease International and Ms Bethany Browne, Human Rights Advisor, International Disability Alliance.

Everyone is welcome.

DAI members will receive the zoom link to join by email.
All others will need to register here please.

DAY/DATE(S):

  • Tuesday, January 26, 2021 (USA/CA/UK/EU)
  • Wednesday, January 27, 2021 (AU/NZ/Asia)
  • Please note this is one event, set in a number of different time zones.

About the Cafe: Every month, DAI hosts a virtual café for its members and their families and supporters, and we have been doing so now for over 7 years!

Each January, we take this opportunity to celebrate our birthday together, and we invite you to join us. From small and humble dreams of global advocacy and human rights, and now, for dementia to be managed as a disability, alongside providing weekly peer to peer support and brain health sessions, we have achieved a lot!

This is your opportunity to hear from others who will share where we have been, acknowledging the work we have done, and dreaming together for our future. Our vision is for all people to be valued and equally included, including people with dementia and our care partners.

Everyone is welcome.

DAI members will receive the zoom link to join by email.
All others will need to register here please.

Programme:

  • Introductions and welcome by Kate Swaffer
  • Graeme Atkins performs, Happy 7th birthday DAI
  • Introducing our new Chair, Alister Robertson from New Zealand
  • Board update, Alister Robertson
  • DAI ‘(W)re-creational Officer, Graeme Atkins performs the DAI 7th birthday song, written by him
  • DAI’s global advocacy, and the value of our collaboration with ADI, by Glenn Rees
  • The importance of human rights and the CRPD for people with dementia, by Bethany Browne
  • An overview of the last 7 years (with images), hosted by Christine, Kate and Wally; you will hear from others including co founder Amy Shives and our long term volunteer Sarah Yeates

We will hear from a number of members and guests, inluding some of our co founders, volunteers and other special guests, including:

Mr John Sandblom, who is a co-founder of Dementia Alliance International (DAI), board member and the current Treasurer, and was instrumental in helping to set up DAI.

Mr Glenn Rees, who is the outgoing Chair of Alzheimer’s Disease International, and a former Chief Executive Office of Dementia Australia.

Ms Bethany Browne, who is the Human Rights Advisor to the International Disability Alliance, and formely worked for Human Rights Watch, including writing two reports on the excessive use of chemical restraint in nursing homes in the US and Australia.

Everyone is welcome.

DAI members will receive the zoom link to join by email.
All others will need to register here please.

DAY/DATE(S):

Tuesday, January 26, 2021 (USA/CA/UK/EU):

  • 1:00 pm Pacific
  • 2:00 pm Mountain
  • 3:00 pm Central
  • 4:00 pm Eastern
  • 9:00 pm London/Glasgow/Dublin UK
  • 10:00 pm Paris, Munich, Amsterdam, EU

Wednesday, January 26, 2021 ( AU/NZ/ASIA):

  • 5:00 am Perth, AU/Taipei/Singapore
  • 7:00 am Brisbane, AU
  • 7:30 am Adelaide, AU
  • 8:00 am Sydney/Melbourne/Canberra/Tasmania/Brisbane, AU
  • 10:00 am Auckland, NZ

The Webinar runs for up to 1.5 hours.

Check your time here if not listed above.

COST TO ATTEND:

  • FREE
  • YOUR DONATIONS ARE GREATLY APPRECIATED

PLEASE DONATE TO DAI OR BECOME AN ASSOCIATE OR PARTNER WITH US. WITHOUT YOU, DAI COULD NOT PROVIDE THE SERVICES WE PROVIDE CURRENTLY FOR MEMBERS, THEIR FAMILIES & OUR GLOBAL FAMILY.

Support people with dementia:

Everyone is welcome.

DAI members will receive the zoom link to join by email.
All others will need to register here please.

THANK YOU

International Day of Persons with Disabilities

The Dementia Alliance International (DAI) membership joins the rest of the world on Thursday 3rd December 2020 to observe the International Day of Persons with Disabilities under the theme “Toward a disability inclusive, accessible and sustainable post COVID-19 world”.

The annual observance of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities was proclaimed in 1992 by United Nations General Assembly. It aims to promote the rights, quality of life and well-being of persons with disabilities and to increase awareness of their situation in every aspect of political, social, economic, and cultural life.

Until recently, people with dementia have been left behind, including in those events and discussions about persons with disabilities, as too few understand dementia is a major cause of disability ad dependence in older persons globally. Many age-related health conditions also cause disability, and the global data does not yet reflect these cohorts.

As the world grapples with the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic, many decisions by policy-makers have failed to take into consideration the rights of persons with disabilities enshrined in the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGS). This is evident in a recent report following a global study which examined the extent to which COVID-19 pandemic has exposed some deep structural inequalities in society.

Data gathered from a study done by for one report “COVID-19, Amplifying Voices: Our Lives, Our Say”, is evidencing that persons with disabilities, older persons, and persons from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds are among those hardest hit by the pandemic.

While this particular report puts a spotlight on the voices of blind and partially sighted persons, many of the experiences shared strongly resonate with numerous other studies conducted by other organizations of persons with disabilities internationally.

In order to ensure that no one is left behind in any aspect, we take this opportunity to call for effective collaboration with representative organizations of persons with disabilities, governments, communities, civil society, UN and other international agencies, and the private sector as we collectively strive to build and sustain a better, more inclusive post-COVID society.

We especially call for governments and health care professionals to accept dementia as a condition causing multiple and progressive disabilities, and to provide disability assessment and support immediately following a diagnosis, including rehabilitation.

 

Video: Our rights under threat as we grow old

The recording of the virtual Side Event held today during the 13th session of the Conference of States Parties to the CRPD is available to watch now.

Our rights under threat as we grow old:  A timely expert discussion on the intersection of disability and age.

1 Dec 2020: A discussion on the disproportionate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on older persons and persons with disabilities, exacerbated by existing ageism, ableism, and shortcomings in support systems and residential care.

Speakers:

  • Gerard Quinn, Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
  • Claudia Mahler, Independent Expert on the Enjoyment of all Human Rights by Older Persons
  • Kate Swaffer, Chair, CEO & Co-founder, Dementia Alliance International (DAI)

Moderator: Bethany Brown, Human Rights Advisor, International Disability Alliance (IDA)

It is also avalable to view on the on the webtv.un.org:  http://webtv.un.org/watch/our-rights-under-threat-as-we-grow-old-a-timely-expert-discussion-on-the-intersection-of-disability-and-age-cosp13-side-event/6213396021001/

Newsflash: Professor Gerard Quinn is the new UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of persons with disabilities

Image: Professor Gerard Quinn is the new UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of persons with disabilities

The Dementia Alliance International wishes to congratulate Professor Gerard Quinn on his appointment as the new UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of persons with disabilities.

Mr. Quinn takes over the role from Ms. Catalina Devandas Aguilar who has worked tirelessly for persons with disabilities, and who has been appointed as Costa Rica’s ambassador to the UN in Geneva. Catalina has actively worked to ensure people with dementia are included in this work, for which we thank her.

Given Mr. Quinn’s extensive experience and expertise, we look forward to the implementation of this important mandate in the coming years.

It is a critical time for the rights of persons with disabilities, and we know Professor Quinn will carry out his role in a way that ensures inclusive, systematic and sustainable change to ensure the universal respect, protection, and fulfillment of the rights of person with disabilities, including peopel with dementia, while fully considering multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination.

The Dementia Alliance International looks forward to the Special Rapporteur’s contribution to the successful implementation of the United Nations Disability Inclusion Strategy as part of ongoing efforts to ensure that the United Nations system is fit for purpose in relation to disability inclusion.

Among his priorities, Mr. Quinn said that he will work to ensure that the voices of persons with disabilities are heard loud and clear, in global responses to general calamities caused by Covid-19, climate change and the armed conflicts. He highlighted the need for systemic change to underpin the gains of the UN CRPD, and to focus attention on the cultural and structural changes needed for the Sustainable Development Goals to be attained.

He will also continue to bring attention to the positive contribution of persons with disabilities, including highlighting the need to promote our active citizenship.

Mr. Quinn is a Professor Emeritus in law at the National University of Ireland, with a long career in public service. He sits on the scientific committee of the European Union Fundamental Rights Agency (EU FRA, Vienna), and has led the delegation of Rehabilitation International during the drafting of the UN CRPD.  To learn more about Mr. Quinn, follow this link.

Gait Retraining and Dementia, by A/Prof James McLoughlin

In July this year, DAI hosted a webinar Gait retraining and Dementia, by A/Prof James McLoughlin. It was very well attended, and we are pleased to share it during Dementia Awareness Month 2020.

James is an Associate Professor at Flinders University in Adelaide. He has a Bachelor of Applied Science (Physio), a MSc(Clinical Neuroscience), and a PhD, and is an experienced neurological physiotherapist and Director of Advanced Neuro Rehab in South Australia, a neurological and vestibular rehabilitation clinic.

James is passionate in promoting best practice for people with neurological & vestibular conditions. He has previously presented to us on Rehabilitation and Dementia.

About the Webinar: People with all forms of dementia can experience changes to their walking and balance. There are many factors that can contribute to these issues that can be targeted within an individualised rehabilitation program. James will discuss some of the proactive ways neurological physiotherapy can help with treatment, training and support.

Watch the webinar recording  here:

#DAM2020 #DAIisLifeChanging #WAM2020

Make sure you get involved in the DAI Art Auction this week.

Communicating with a person with aphasia

Image source: Kate Swaffer

In the last few weeks, a lot of people and organizations who have never before used zoom (or a similar online platform) have had to meet online for work, family and social gatherings.

Even organizations who have been using zoom for a long time, have started producing help sheets and other resources on how to use it. At last… the world is catching up, and people with dementia really appreciate it!

Online communicating is difficult, but for many who are diagnosed with dementia, is preferable to a phone call, as we can see the others persons face and expressions, and therefore alsohave a visual cue beyond a name of who we are talking to.

For those with dementia who also have aphasia such as Primary Progressive Aphasia, it is not easy to communicate in person, let alone online, hence we wanted to post this blog with some tips and other resources.

DAI has posted blogs on aphasia previously, including a short video in 2016 on a post titleed Understanding Aphasia. This DAI blog also has a caregivers guide, produced by the National Aphasia Association, and the following video is worth watching (again).

The National Aphasia Association in America also has a lot of useful information on their website.

Tips for Communicating with a Person with Aphasia

These tips may make it easier for you to understand and talk with people with any type of aphasia. To help a person with aphasia communicate with you, try the following:

  1. Get their attention before you start speaking.
  2. Keep eye contact.
  3. Watch for body language and the gestures used.
  4. Talk in a quiet place. Turn off the TV or radio, and reduce other noise. Ask others in the area to do the same.
  5. Keep your voice at a normal level. You do not need to talk louder unless you are asked to (we are not all hearing impaired).
  6. Keep the words you use simple but adult. Do not “talk down” to the person with aphasia, as if having aphasia (or dementia) means having intellectual deficits.
  7. Use shorter sentences, and if possible, repeat key words that are important to understand.
  8. Slow down your speech, but not so much that is sounds insulting or patronising.
  9. Give the person time to speak; it may take longer.
  10. Try not to finish sentences or find words for them; this poem may help explain why.
  11. Try using drawings, gestures, writing, and facial expressions. People may understand those better than words sometimes.
  12. Ask the person with aphasia to draw, write, or point when  having trouble talking.
  13. Ask more “yes” and “no” questions. Those are easier than questions thatare need to be answered using lots of words or sentences.
  14. It is ok if the peson makes mistakes sometimes. They  may not be able to say everything perfectly all the time, but neither may you.
  15. Let them try to do things for themselves, even if they need to try a few times. Help me when help is asked for. Unless it is dangerous there is no need to intervene uness asked to.
  16. Aphasia does not equate to an intellectual disability, but rather is a language impairment or disability

Whilst DAI currently does not have peer to peer support groups specifically for people with aphasia, if we have enough requests to do so again, we will do o ur best to set one up. Contact us at [email protected] if you or someone you support is interested.

Register now for our June “Meeting Of The Minds” Webinar, Dementia, Human Rights, Selfcare and COVID-19

Happy New Year & Happy 6th Birthday DAI lo

Welcome to 2020, and Happy 6th Birthday, and congratulations to everyone at Dementia Alliance International (DAI) for such a successful 2019.

Today we share some of our achievements for 2019, which include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Celebrating our 5th birthday on this day last year! Special thanks to Graeme Atkins for his delightful song
  • Our continued strategic partnership with Alzheimer’s Disease International; we thank them for their continued sponsorship and support
  • Our first strategic partnership with a national advocacy organisation; thank you Dementia Australia for your support in 2019, and your committment to continued sponsorship and support of DAI into 2020 and beyond
  • Representation at the World Health Assembly in May, the Rehabilitation 2030 meetings, and the Mental health Forum in October
  • The first DAI Side Event “Dementia: the leading cause of disability” was held at the Conference Of State Parties (COSP) on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD); this was the first time a Side Event dedicated to dmentia has ever been held at the COSP in New York
  • Collaboration with the Alzheimer’s Society UK and the 3 Nations Dementia Working Group on a Directory of Resources on advocacy, and a short video: The Many Voices of Dementia, released in July
  • DAI held its first Capacity Building Workshop in Las Angeles in July
  • DAI was proud to become a Champion Organisation partner with StepUp 4 Dementia Research in Australia; supporting research is imperative for treatments, as well as improving care and reducing risk of dementia, If you live in Australia, please sign up.
  • Dr Jennifer Bute (DAI member) continues to support the ADI Alzheimer’s University, and other members in the UK also provide support to ADI, including Howard Gordon presenting on the panel, Let’s Talk about Dementia Research: Maintaining hope when trials end
  • A second volunteer, Tamara Claunch from Houston Texas joined  long time volunteer Sarah Yeates; thanks to them both. They have also agreed to take on more formal roles at DAI, to support our board and leadership (to be anounced next week)
  • Membership is increasing steadily
  • Increases to additional new free members services, including, for example two Living Alone Social peer to peer support groups
  • Updates to many of our Governance documents and By Laws, soon to be announced and shared
  • It took almost six years, but we now have a committed group of professionals who have agreed to be members of our Professional Advisory Committee, soon to be announced.
  • We introduced the new Board Of Directors for 2020 at the Annual General Meeting in November(to be announced in detail next week), congratulate them all, and thank them for their willingness to serve on the BOD
  • The WHO launched their new Quality Rights initiative and Toolkit. DAI members Professor Peter Mittler and Kate Swaffer both contributed significantly to this on behalf of DAI
  • Many DAI members have also worked with the WHO on their Dementia Friendly Initiatives work, which is still in draft stage and is to be released this year
  • Ms. Catalina Devandas Aguilar, the Special Rapporteur on the rights of person with disabilities launched a report on the rights of older persons with disabilities at the 74th session of the General Assembly in October 2019. The report identifies and addresses specific human rights concerns faced by both people with disabilities who are ageing and older persons who acquire a disability. DAI was invited to review the draft, and able to ensure dementia was included
  • We have two formal publication in progress, finally, to be released sometime in 2020
  • Finally, please find the time to complete the DAI Survey on Advocacy and involvement in Dementia Research and Policy; Responses are needed by January 15, 2020. Thank you.  

Of course, there have been many other achievements by individual DAI members, working locally, nationally or globally, as always, far too many to list. However, DAI knows that advocacy takes a physical and cognitive (and sometmes emotional) toll on every person with dementia, and their care partner and family.

DAI thanks you all for your hard work.