Category Archives: Rehabilitation

Communicating with a person with aphasia

Image source: Kate Swaffer

In the last few weeks, a lot of people and organizations who have never before used zoom (or a similar online platform) have had to meet online for work, family and social gatherings.

Even organizations who have been using zoom for a long time, have started producing help sheets and other resources on how to use it. At last… the world is catching up, and people with dementia really appreciate it!

Online communicating is difficult, but for many who are diagnosed with dementia, is preferable to a phone call, as we can see the others persons face and expressions, and therefore alsohave a visual cue beyond a name of who we are talking to.

For those with dementia who also have aphasia such as Primary Progressive Aphasia, it is not easy to communicate in person, let alone online, hence we wanted to post this blog with some tips and other resources.

DAI has posted blogs on aphasia previously, including a short video in 2016 on a post titleed Understanding Aphasia. This DAI blog also has a caregivers guide, produced by the National Aphasia Association, and the following video is worth watching (again).

The National Aphasia Association in America also has a lot of useful information on their website.

Tips for Communicating with a Person with Aphasia

These tips may make it easier for you to understand and talk with people with any type of aphasia. To help a person with aphasia communicate with you, try the following:

  1. Get their attention before you start speaking.
  2. Keep eye contact.
  3. Watch for body language and the gestures used.
  4. Talk in a quiet place. Turn off the TV or radio, and reduce other noise. Ask others in the area to do the same.
  5. Keep your voice at a normal level. You do not need to talk louder unless you are asked to (we are not all hearing impaired).
  6. Keep the words you use simple but adult. Do not “talk down” to the person with aphasia, as if having aphasia (or dementia) means having intellectual deficits.
  7. Use shorter sentences, and if possible, repeat key words that are important to understand.
  8. Slow down your speech, but not so much that is sounds insulting or patronising.
  9. Give the person time to speak; it may take longer.
  10. Try not to finish sentences or find words for them; this poem may help explain why.
  11. Try using drawings, gestures, writing, and facial expressions. People may understand those better than words sometimes.
  12. Ask the person with aphasia to draw, write, or point when  having trouble talking.
  13. Ask more “yes” and “no” questions. Those are easier than questions thatare need to be answered using lots of words or sentences.
  14. It is ok if the peson makes mistakes sometimes. They  may not be able to say everything perfectly all the time, but neither may you.
  15. Let them try to do things for themselves, even if they need to try a few times. Help me when help is asked for. Unless it is dangerous there is no need to intervene uness asked to.
  16. Aphasia does not equate to an intellectual disability, but rather is a language impairment or disability

Whilst DAI currently does not have peer to peer support groups specifically for people with aphasia, if we have enough requests to do so again, we will do o ur best to set one up. Contact us at [email protected] if you or someone you support is interested.

Register now for our June “Meeting Of The Minds” Webinar, Dementia, Human Rights, Selfcare and COVID-19

Happy New Year & Happy 6th Birthday DAI lo

Welcome to 2020, and Happy 6th Birthday, and congratulations to everyone at Dementia Alliance International (DAI) for such a successful 2019.

Today we share some of our achievements for 2019, which include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Celebrating our 5th birthday on this day last year! Special thanks to Graeme Atkins for his delightful song
  • Our continued strategic partnership with Alzheimer’s Disease International; we thank them for their continued sponsorship and support
  • Our first strategic partnership with a national advocacy organisation; thank you Dementia Australia for your support in 2019, and your committment to continued sponsorship and support of DAI into 2020 and beyond
  • Representation at the World Health Assembly in May, the Rehabilitation 2030 meetings, and the Mental health Forum in October
  • The first DAI Side Event “Dementia: the leading cause of disability” was held at the Conference Of State Parties (COSP) on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD); this was the first time a Side Event dedicated to dmentia has ever been held at the COSP in New York
  • Collaboration with the Alzheimer’s Society UK and the 3 Nations Dementia Working Group on a Directory of Resources on advocacy, and a short video: The Many Voices of Dementia, released in July
  • DAI held its first Capacity Building Workshop in Las Angeles in July
  • DAI was proud to become a Champion Organisation partner with StepUp 4 Dementia Research in Australia; supporting research is imperative for treatments, as well as improving care and reducing risk of dementia, If you live in Australia, please sign up.
  • Dr Jennifer Bute (DAI member) continues to support the ADI Alzheimer’s University, and other members in the UK also provide support to ADI, including Howard Gordon presenting on the panel, Let’s Talk about Dementia Research: Maintaining hope when trials end
  • A second volunteer, Tamara Claunch from Houston Texas joined  long time volunteer Sarah Yeates; thanks to them both. They have also agreed to take on more formal roles at DAI, to support our board and leadership (to be anounced next week)
  • Membership is increasing steadily
  • Increases to additional new free members services, including, for example two Living Alone Social peer to peer support groups
  • Updates to many of our Governance documents and By Laws, soon to be announced and shared
  • It took almost six years, but we now have a committed group of professionals who have agreed to be members of our Professional Advisory Committee, soon to be announced.
  • We introduced the new Board Of Directors for 2020 at the Annual General Meeting in November(to be announced in detail next week), congratulate them all, and thank them for their willingness to serve on the BOD
  • The WHO launched their new Quality Rights initiative and Toolkit. DAI members Professor Peter Mittler and Kate Swaffer both contributed significantly to this on behalf of DAI
  • Many DAI members have also worked with the WHO on their Dementia Friendly Initiatives work, which is still in draft stage and is to be released this year
  • Ms. Catalina Devandas Aguilar, the Special Rapporteur on the rights of person with disabilities launched a report on the rights of older persons with disabilities at the 74th session of the General Assembly in October 2019. The report identifies and addresses specific human rights concerns faced by both people with disabilities who are ageing and older persons who acquire a disability. DAI was invited to review the draft, and able to ensure dementia was included
  • We have two formal publication in progress, finally, to be released sometime in 2020
  • Finally, please find the time to complete the DAI Survey on Advocacy and involvement in Dementia Research and Policy; Responses are needed by January 15, 2020. Thank you.  

Of course, there have been many other achievements by individual DAI members, working locally, nationally or globally, as always, far too many to list. However, DAI knows that advocacy takes a physical and cognitive (and sometmes emotional) toll on every person with dementia, and their care partner and family.

DAI thanks you all for your hard work.

Universal Health Coverage Day 2019

December 12  is  International Universal Health Coverage Day, a day where  we must remind governments AND health care providers that everyone has a right to health.

As background on the history of this day, in 2014, the Universal Health Coverage Coalition started to celebrate 12 December as Universal Health Coverage (UHC) Day,  commemorating the date on which the UN General Assembly officially recognised the importance of UHC. It is a United Nations-designated day, which was officially resolved on 12 December 2017.

Since then, the day has become the annual rallying point for the growing global movement for #Health4All.

Every person—no matter who they are, what health condition they have, or where they live, should be able to get the quality health coverage and services they need without facing financial hardship.

DAI knows that most people with dementia do not receive full health coverage, nor adequate post diagnostic support to live with dementia; instead, they are too often only advised to go home and prepare to die.  And for those people with dementia and their families who choose a different pathway, the cost is often crippling.

Three months after the historic high-level meeting the the United Nations General Assembly on universal health coverage (held on 23 September 2019),  we understand that dementia was not specifically included in discussions, in spite of the many years of global advocacy by DAI and ADI.

This is not a positive outcome for the more than 50 million people currently livign with dementia!

This high-level meeting, held under the theme “Universal Health Coverage: Moving Together to Build a Healthier World,” aimed to accelerate progress toward universal health coverage (UHC), including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health-care services and access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all.

Yet, we know that people with dementia are still being denied access to health care, all over the world. 

Let’s all rally together to ensure everyone, including people with dementia are not left behind in the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals Agenda! 

 

International Day of People with Disability #IDPwD

The International Day of People with Disability (IDPwD) is a United Nations-sanctioned day, celebrated internationally on 3 December, with the aim to increase awareness of gains to be derived from inclusion of people with disability in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life. It is imperative that persons with dementia are included in these campaigns.

The theme this year is ‘Promoting the participation of persons with disabilities and their leadership: taking action on the 2030 Development Agenda’.

It focuses on the empowerment of people with disability for inclusive, equitable and sustainable development as anticipated in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

  • We must ‘leave no one behind’
  • We must recognise disability as a cross-cutting issue, and
  • This must include people with dementia. 

It is imperative we all work towards ensuring that dementia is recognised by all as a condition causing acquired cognitive and other disabilities, and therefore that all people diagnosed with dementia have inalienable rights to full and equal access to the CRPD and other Conventions, and to Universal Health Coverage, including rehabilitation.

To celebrate the International Day of People with Disability this year, and as we work towards claiming our rights, alongside all other people with any disabilities, let’s watch the first DAI Side Event from the CoSP in June 2019 again.

Support people with dementia to attend the Alzheimers Disease International 34th International Conference in Singapore in March 2020. Early Bird registrations have been extended to Friday, December 13, 2019.

Support Christine Thelker – From Canada to Singapore: A Quest for Human Rights

#Hello, my name is Cheryl Day

As we move into the second half of September, DAI continues to share #Hello stories from our members.

Please join us in celebrating life, and working towards a world where people with dementia and their families receive  improved diagnosis experiences and rates, and better care which includes rehabilitation. Of course we all want a cure or a disease modifying drug for even one type or cause of dementia, but the more than 50 million people currently living with dementia and their families also deserve the better care.

Special thanks to Cheryl Day for sharing her story with us today.

Image source: Cheryl Day

Hello My Name is Cheryl Day. 

Working cross culturally in Africa has many challenges and joys. Since 2009 I had been volunteering for SIM (Serving in Mission) in Ethiopia and Zimbabwe as a Horticulturalist (training farmers in conservation agriculture & food security) and a Pastor. I can tell you lots of stories of my adventures.

The joys were many, like opportunity to build new relationships, friendships, making a difference in peoples lives and the impact they had on my own life. Challenges like learning new languages and cultural cues, almost ending up in jail in Ethiopia, living standards and resource availability way different to Australia, and having two very serious back injuries while there. I thought this was about as challenging as my life could be.

While in Zimbabwe, October 2016, I had some unusual health symptoms that I couldn’t make out. In January 2017 I had the regular tests in South Africa for previous health issues, but the tests showed all was fine, but I knew that something was wrong. At the same time my issues started my sister was diagnosed with AML Leukemia back home. I eventually made a trip home in March 2017 to spend time with her and family.

While home I took advantage of better medical facilities to begin investigating my own health issues. At first, they thought my symptoms matched Multiple Sclerosis (MS). There was also a thought that there may be two major conditions happening at once. However, with no certain diagnosis I was given a clearance to return to Zimbabwe and continue the vital work there.

To cut a long story short after returning back to Australia the end of 2017 I finally got an official full diagnosis in May 2018 as test results showed a further decline from 12 months pervious.

Absolutely shattered at the prognosis of a growing list of health conditions and told to get all my affairs in order.

At 51 years old I was diagnosed with a rare condition – the semantic variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia. Plus issues from a Chiari Malformation of the brain, osteoporosis, recovering from a fall in Zimbabwe September 2017 where I had shattered 3 vertebrae in my back (a miracle I didn’t come home in a wheel Chair), and issues from the previous 2013 back injury.

Devastated knowing that this would be the final straw to end a goal of volunteering in Africa long term. (by the way I did get back to Zimbabwe to say goodbye in Sept/Oct 2018). I cried more than I had ever before, felt totally defeated, this was the end of my missionary adventures, the ability to enjoy life and continue to contribute into the lives of others.

One day I was listening to the radio and they were interviewing a lady named Kate Swaffer and her journey with dementia. Of course, my ears pricked up given my current circumstances and I listened intently to the interview.

I grabbed my computer and googled Dementia Alliance International. Becoming involved with DAI and connecting with Kate was the breakthrough I had been praying for and haven’t looked back since.

From the beginning of 2019 the support groups, the informative webinars, the friendships I’m making, the realisation of knowing I’m not alone in this, the opportunity to volunteer and help in advocacy for dementia are lifesaving.

A new focus, new life and new possibilities.

I am learning what I have read in the Bible so many times about living one day at a time and not worrying about tomorrow. I am still capable of many things, have a lot to offer and my passion of empowering people continues, just with a different perspective.

Cheryl Day © 2019

Please help us support more people like Cheryl living with dementia to share their stories and live more positively by donating or partnering with Dementia Alliance International.

Register now for DAI’s July Webinar: Dementia as a Disability

We invite you to register now for DAI’s “A Meeting Of The Minds” Webinar, July 24/25, 2019, with presenter and DAI Board member, Christine Thelker from Canada.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please note: this is one event, set in a number of different time zones.

About the Webinar: DAI recently held a Side Event at the 12th Session of the Conference Of State Parties (COSP) on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). This webinar will highlight the event, focusing on why dementia must be managed as a disability and why people with dementia are rights bearers as all others, such as universal heath care including rehabilitation. The panel included a group of eminent speakers, and was a rich discussion on dementia as a disability, on people with dementia as rights bearers, and of the rights of all, including people with dementia to rehabilitation and other services, and to full and equal access to the CRPD

The overarching theme was social inclusion and health, two determinants of well-being, both of which are being systematically denied to people with dementia all around the world. Dementia had never been represented formally in a Side Event ever before at the COSP, hence why DAI felt it was so important.

Our disabilities may be more invisible than many others, but we are still, even in 2019, being stigmatised and discriminated against on a daily basis, and we hope this event will be the start of change for the more than 50 million people currently living with dementia, and every person being newly diagnosed every 3.2 seconds.

As an organisation DAI continues to work towards others joining our campaign that dementia is a condition causing acquired cognitive and other disabilities, and for full and equal access to the CRPD and other Conventions, so that no one is left behind, including people with dementia. Rehabilitation, and all other health and disability services and support are essential for maintaining independence and dignity, for longer, and whilst dementia is a terminal condition, we should not all be ‘dying at diagnosis’.

About our speaker: Christine Thelker, a current board member of DAI, is from Vernon, British Columbia, Canada and at 59 says, her sense of humour has grown, since her diagnosis of dementia. She is a Board member of Dementia Alliance International, and previously worked for the Interior Health Authority for 13 years in various sites, including in dementia care and of life care. She advocates for families and patients and for better training for workers in dementia care. She also advocated for better working environments for the employees. Christine designed and taught a program to nursing students at the local colleges on end of life care and dementia care, and designed a program on unattended sorrow, which was in relation to all the deaths workers saw and the cumulative effects. She believes it has many similar effects on people diagnosed with dementia and doing more work around that. Widowed at 47 and then diagnosed with Vascular dementia at 56, Christine is still advocating, using her voice to help others. She loves working with Dementia Alliance International (DAI) and believes whole-heartedly that it helps keep her living well with her dementia. Her motto since being diagnosed is “I’m not done yet”.

Register here…

Wednesday, July 24, 2019 (USA/CA/UK/EU):

  • 11:30 am Honolulu
  • 2:30 pm Pacific
  • 3:30 pm Mountain
  • 4:30 pm Central
  • 5:30 pm Eastern
  • 10:30 pm London/Glasgow/Dublin UK
  • 11:30 pm Paris, Munich, Amsterdam, EU

Thursday, July 25, 2019 (AU/NZ/JP/SGP/TWN/CHN):

  • 7:00 am Adelaide AU
  • 7:30 am Brisbane/Sydney/Melbourne/Canberra/Tasmania AU
  • 5:30 am Perth AU/Taipei//Beijing
  • 9:30 am Auckland, NZ

The Webinar runs for 1.5 hours. Check your time if not listed above by using this link:

COST TO ATTEND:

  • DAI Members/Care partners: FREE
  • Employed people: DONATIONS APPRECIATED
  • Full time Students: DONATIONS APPRECIATED

Register here…

Donations are appreciated.

Join us online today for the DAI Side Event: Dementia as a disability

Please join us online today for the DAI Side Event being hosted at the 12th Session of the Conference Of State Parties (COSP) on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Dementia: The leading cause of disability.

The overarching theme is of social inclusion and health, which are two of the determinants of well-being, both of which are being systematically denied to people with dementia all around the world, including in the developed countries. UN Web TV

Watch live UN Web tv at the following times:

  • Thu, 13 Jun 2019 at 6:45 am Pacific Time
  • Thu, 13 Jun 2019 at 7:45 am Mountain Time
  • Thu, 13 Jun 2019 at 8:45 am Central Time
  • Thu, 13 Jun 2019 at 9:45 am Eastern Time – LIVE IN NYC
  • Thu, 13 Jun 2019 at 2:45 pm London, UK BST
  • Thu, 13 Jun 2019 at 3:45 pm Brussels, Belgium CEST
  • Thu, 13 Jun 2019 at 11:15 pm Adelaide, Australia ACST
  • Thu, 13 Jun 2019 at 9:45 pm Perth, Australia AWST
  • Thu, 13 Jun 2019 at 11:45 pm Sydney/Melbourne/Brisbane, Australia AEST
  • Fri, 14 Jun 2019 at 1:45 am Auckland, New Zealand NZST

Speakers

We will hear from an eminent list of speakers, on the rights of persons with any type of disability, including dementia, to full and equal access to the CRPD, and specifically on the right to rehabilitation and to Universal Health Care:

Mrs. Catalina Devandas Aguilar, UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of persons with disabilities: opening remarks

Christine Thelker, DAI Board Member:“Dementia as a disability”

Bethany Brown, Researcher, Older People’s Rights, Disability Rights Division, Human Rights Watch: “Violations of the rights of older people with dementia”

Arlene Pietranton, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: “Rehabilitation for dementia and aphasia”

Mr. Antony Duttine, Regional Advisor in disabilities and rehabilitation, Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organisation (PAHO/WHO): “QualityRights” 

Jan Monsbakken, Global Rehabilitation Alliance: “The Rights to Rehabilitation for All”

Kate Swaffer, Dementia Alliance International, Chair/CEO: Closing remarks

Please check your time here if not listed above: https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/fixedtime.html?msg=DAI+CoSP+Side+Event+June+2019&iso=20190613T0945&p1=2416&ah=1&am=15

Statement by DAI Chair Kate Swaffer #COSP12

Civil Society Statement presented at the Conference of State Parties (COSP) on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), on June 13, 2019, presented by DAI Chair, Kate Swaffer.

Tune into the live UN TV webcast here to watch the days proceedings.

Distinguished Chairs, speakers and delegates.

Thank you for the opportunity to make this statement on behalf of Dementia Alliance International, a registered charity providing advocacy and support for people with dementia. We are also celebrating its 5th birthday.

Started in 2014 by 8 people with dementia including me, it has become the global voice of dementia.

We started with a dream, specifically for full and equal inclusion, and to be respected and valued as members of society. We also advocate for equal access to universal health care.

This has become our dream for the more than 50 million people with dementia, and each person newly diagnosed every 3 seconds.

That is also why DAI has organised a Side Event, taking place on Thursday morning.

No one and no organisation has ever represented people with dementia in this way, at this conference before.

Being diagnosed myself with dementia aged 49 taught me what the late Dr Martin Luther King Jnr.  called ‘that sense of otherness’.

I had not been stigmatised or discriminated against, except as a woman.

I had not come from a deeply marginalised group.

However as one of the 50 million people currently living with dementia who’s life was thrown in the bin at the time of my diagnosis, and still experiencing stigmas and discrimination.

Dementia is a significant global issue; it is the 7th cause of death globally, the 5th cause of death in America, and the 2nd cause of death in Australia.

However, after a diagnosis, we do not receive access to universal health health care.

We do not receive post diagnosis rehabilitation or most other allied health services to support our independence or social inclusion.

We are segregated from others when we require assisted living. 

We are institutionalised.

We are restrained physically and chemically, with no consideration of our rights.

In society, clinical practice is only provided, when supported by strong evidence based research.

However, the use of the concept Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) was implemented, with no evidence based research was implemented.

This has lead to further chemical and physical restraint.

Secure dementia units, also a breach of many of our rights, including our right to freedom, are evolving into dementia villages, again with no evidence based research for their value.

Disease or disability specific villages are little different to ghettoisation of groups of people.

They are not a solution to those people with dementia who do need assisted living.

We are daily and systemically being denied our human rights.

Unfortunately, people with dementia who decide to manage their symptoms as disabilities and proactively seek disability support, are also often demonised for daring to live positively.

Approximately 5 years ago the Dementia Envoy for the World Dementia Council Dr Gillings said people with dementia may need to take to the streets and march on the steps of parliaments.

This is the beginning of that march, so that people with dementia are not left behind in the 2030 Agenda.

Thank you

Kate Swaffer
Chair, CEO & co-founder
Dementia Alliance International

Update on the upcoming 12th session of the Conference of State Parties to the CRPD

Next week, the 12th session of the Conference of States Parties (COSP) to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities takes place from Tuesday 11 to Thursday 13 June 2019 at UN Headquarters in New York. On Monday 10 June, a Civil Society CRPD Forum will be held to complement the Conference.

DAI will be attending both events, aiming to represent the 50 million people currently living with dementia, and each person who is  newly diagnosed every 3.2 seconds. It is a hostorical moment in the advocacy of, by and for people with dementia. That this DAI Side Event was accepted is a first, and highlighting. Dementia as a disability has never been represented  at the CoSP conference ever before.

The Themes and Sub-Themes

The overarching theme of the Conference is “Ensuring the inclusion of persons with disabilities in a changing world through the implementation of the CRPD”.  This is highly relevant to people with dementia and our families.

Three round tables will address the following themes:

  • Technology, digitalization and ICTs for the empowerment and inclusion of persons with disabilities
  • Social inclusion and the right of the highest attainable standard of health
  • Inclusion of persons with disabilities in society through participation in cultural life, recreation, leisure and sports

Highlights for the week:

  • The Civil Society Forum on Mon 10 June will address what is the current state of play; capacity building; and protection of the rights of children with disabilities.
  • Civil Society representatives speaking in all official sessions of the CoSP and co-moderating all three round-tables from Tues 11 to Thurs 13th June.
  • On Wednesday 12,  Matters related to the implementation of the Convention (item 5 (b) (ii): Round Table 2. Social inclusion and the right to the highest attainable standard of health – will be co-chaired by H.E. Ambassador Katalin Annamária Bogyay of Hungary, Vice President of the Conference and Ms. Kate Swaffer Civil Society representative from Dementia Alliance International, also Chair and CEO of DAI.
  • The Chair of the International Disability Alliance will speak at the opening of the CoSP, as a representative of the Civil Society Coordination Mechanism, and alongside UN Secretary-General
  • 100 side-events are being organised, covering a broad range of topics
  • IDA and its members will also be co-sponsoring and/or speaking at over 20 side-events, including DAI’s.
  • DAI is hosting its own and first Side Event on Dementia as the leading cause of disability on June 13, with live web  cast, International Sign and Closed Captioning services provided, to ensure accessibility to and for as many people as possible

Don’t miss watching the DAI side-event “Dementia: the leading cause of disability”.

DAI will be not only be celebrating our 5th Birthday at this exciting event,  but also ensuring dementia as a disability definitively joins the global disability stage. This event is being held on Thursday June 13, 9.45-11.00 am in Conference Room 11.

Note: We will be posting a blog with the times and link to the live webcast as soon as the link is available to share.

 

Rehabilitation for dementia: evidence and opportunities

For those of you who missed our latest Webinar presented by Associate Professor Lee-Fay Low, Rehabilitation for dementia: evidence and opportunities, it is now available to view here and on our YouTube channel. Thanks again to Lee-Fay for her continued support for DAI.

About the Webinar: The World Health Organisation has defined rehabilitation as “a set of measures that assist individuals, who experience or are likely to experience disability, to achieve and maintain optimum functioning in interaction with their environments”. Research and practice relating to dementia is predominantly focused on prevention, disease-modifying treatment, and care. This presentation will review the current evidence for rehabilitation strategies (e.g. exercise, cognitive training, occupational therapy) in dementia, and outline several ongoing studies. Barriers to rehabilitation for dementia will also be presented.

About A/Professor Low: Lee-Fay Low (BSc Psych (Hons), PhD) is Associate Professor in Ageing and Health, NHMRC Boosting Dementia Research Leadership Development Fellow, and Head of Behavioural and Social Sciences in Health in the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney. She is a registered psychologist with a PhD in psychiatric epidemiology.

A/Prof Low conducts research that she hopes will make a difference in the world.

Her main areas of expertise are in home and residential care for older people, wellbeing in people with dementia, dementia risk factors for dementia, dementia literacy, and people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. She is particularly interested in developing and evaluating interventions to improve the quality of life of older people. She has methodological skills in population studies, systematic reviews, clustered randomised trials, instrument development and evaluation, and translation of research into practice.

She has authored over 100 peer-reviewed articles, as well as two books on dementia. She is an active advocate in improving how older people are treated and cared for. Lee-Fay thinks that research is great fun, and even admits to liking statistics.

Watch the presentation below, and download the slides here…