Category Archives: Rehabilitation

International Day of People with Disability 2021

The International Day of People with Disability #IDPwD is held on 3 December every year, and is a United Nations observance day aimed at increasing public awareness, understanding and acceptance of all people with any type of disability.

Each year the UN announces a theme to observe for International Day of People with Disability, which provides an overarching focus on how society can strive for inclusivity through the removal of physical, technological and attitudinal barriers for people with disability. This has been occurring since 1992 when the General Assembly announced 3 December as the International Day of Disabled Persons.

The annual observance of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities was proclaimed in 1992 by the United Nations General Assembly. It aims to promote the rights, quality of life and well-being of persons with disabilities and to increase awareness of their situation in every aspect of political, social, economic, and cultural life. This year, our past Chair and CEO, and co-founder of DAI, Kate Swaffer writes about why she believes it is critical to manage and supporting dementia as a disability. Thank you Kate.

The Dementia Alliance International (DAI) membership joins the rest of the world on Friday 3rd December 2021 to observe the International Day of Persons with Disabilities. The theme this year is Leadership and participation of persons with disabilities toward an inclusive, accessible and sustainable post-COVID-19 world’.

Dementia is a condition causing disabilities.

During this years celebration of people with disabilities, the 2021 theme is ‘Fighting for rights in the post-COVID era.”, and  we are observing the challenges, barriers and opportunities for people who live with disabilities, in the context of a global pandemic.

My hope for this UN Observance Day is that dementia is a condition causing disabilities will be embedded into policy and practice everywhere. We must fight for this right, and interestingly, the covid pandemic has not only highlighted our experience of islation, discrimination and stigma, it has also highlighted how many of our rights are being denied.

Not to treat dementia as a condition causing acquired cognitive and other disabilities, is a major barrier to improving quality of life and reducing stigma and isolaton. To do so, is also an excellent opportunity to create real change.

As I continue to advocate about my continuing concerns of the lack of dementia being well recognised as a condition causing disability in academia, in policy and in service provision, I have to work har don retaining HOPE, which  members tell us joining DAI also gives them.

This is especially so, when for example, a research project is specifically concerning post diagnostic care, support and services, or quality of life for people living with dementia.

Since my own diagnosis of a younger onset dementia 13 years ago, I am becoming increasingly distessed by the lack of recognition of dementia as a disability and lack of proactive support for the more than 55 million people with dementia to live with more hope, and to live more independently for longer. 

People newly diagnosed with dementia already have their hope taken away at the time of diagnosis, so to have it taken away again (repeatedly) due to others refusing to accept that dementia is a condition causing cognitive and other disabilities, is systematically denying us proactive disability support at the time of diagnosis and takes away more hope of living positively with a diagnosis of any type or cause of dementia.

Having been advised by every professional working in dementia (except my neurologist) to ‘go home, get my end of life affairs in order, give up work and give up study…’ and even ‘to get acquainted with aged care so I would get used to it’, it is curious to personally know so many people with dementia all around the globe who have lived many years, some even decades, beyond the projected life span they were given at the time of their own diagnoses, and many of these people say it is mostly due to managing dementia as a disability. 

Thankfully my university taught me to see the symptoms of dementia as disabilities and provided me with disability assessment and then very proactive disability support to keep living my own life, not too long after diagnosis. Of course, I did not especially like accepting another seemingly negative D-word. Accepting I had a diagnosis of dementia, and the stigma and discrimination due to the label of dementia was bad enough but accepting dementia as a disability initially added to my misery. 

However, this is a critical step that was hugely important in my ability to live more positively – and importantly, more independently – with younger onset dementia. 

  • Dementia is listed as a major cause of disabilityand dependence on the WHO website 
  • In 2010, the World Health Organisation launched the updated version of the WHO DisabilityAssessment Schedule (WHODAS 2.0), the internal classification of functioning, disability and health, and at the same time stated on their website under Dementia Facts, that dementia is a condition which is the leading cause of disability and dependence. (It now says a major cause)
  • People with Younger Onset Dementia (YOD) in Australia now receive services via the NDIS (a government funded disabilityservice)
  • Many universities globally now see and support people with dementia as people with acquired disabilities, following the lead of the University of South Australia, who to my knowledge, were the first to do this for a person with dementia after my diagnosis
  • It is recognised by the CRPD Committee and the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities as a condition causing disabilities
  • The International Disability Alliance accepted DAI as an Observer member in 2016, as they also now recognise dementia as a condition causing acquired cognitive (and other) disabilities
  • The WHO re-categorised it in 2017, as a condition causing cognitive disabilities (it had been listed under psychosocial disabilities before then).

If we ignored something as important as this in any other health space, everyone would be advocating for change. 

Whilst it may be unpleasant accepting a second D-word – that dementia causes disabilities is a reality and being advised this soon after a diagnosis potentially allows many more people to be distressed about their diagnosis for a shorter period, and to become more proactive about their diagnosis by actively seek disability support. 

Everyone has the right to knowledge, and to appropriate care and support.

Everyone has the right to be told that dementia causes disabilities. 

Following stroke, people are advised of their ‘residual (and other) disabilities’ and almost immediately offered rehabilitation and other support to live with them. That is not easy to accept either, but it is necessary to ensure the best outcomes and highest quality of life for someone after a stroke. 

If a university can provide disability assessment and disability support for a person diagnosed with dementia to continue living – why then, is it so hard to by everyone else? I believe it is critical if we are ever to improve post diagnostic experiences for people more newly diagnosed with dementia.

Not to tell people when first diagnosed with any type of dementia, that the symptoms are progressive disabilities, goes against their most basic humna right to knowledge about their condition.

Not to,  also denies them disability assessment and support soon after diagnosis and an awareness tht for many, it may be possible to maintain independence and a higher quality of life for much longer.

It is akin to not telling a person newly diagnosed with cancer there are treatments that may – or may not – work. 

Donate to or Partner with DAI

Watch our webinar “Cognition-oriented treatments for people with dementia” on YouTube

Available to watch now is the recording of the September Webinar, Cognition oriented treatments for people with dementia, by by Dr. Alex Bahar-Fuchs and Dr. Loren Mowszowski. It was one of four from our 2021 Dementia Awareness Month series of webinars focused on Rehabilitation for Dementia webinars.

“Cognition-oriented treatments for people with dementia”

This webinar was presented by Dr. Alex Bahar-Fuchs who is a clinical neuropsychologist and an NHMRC senior research fellow in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Melbourne, and Dr. Loren Mowszowski who is a registered Clinical Neuropsychologist and NHMRC-ARC Dementia Research Development Fellow at the University of Sydney.

About this DAI “Meeting Of The Minds” Webinar

There are no known effective interventions to stop or reverse the progression of symptoms in people with dementia; however, many treatments are available to slow the process of decline, reduce the impact of cognitive and functional impairment, and improve the day-to-day experience, quality of life and confidence in people living with dementia.

In line with this, several high-quality Clinical Practice Guidelines for dementia rehabilitation around the world predominantly focus on recommendations targeting cognitive and mental functions, and a large body of evidence indicates that cognitively oriented treatments have shown promise in relation to cognitive outcomes. In this presentation, we will discuss the key features and evidence behind three main approaches to cognitively oriented treatments: cognitive training, cognitive rehabilitation and cognitive stimulation therapy.

The presentation included some practical examples of how the techniques underpinning some of these approaches can be used to support day-to-day activities. For health professionals, we propose key factors to consider when planning or implementing cognitively oriented treatments. Finally, the presenters proposed areas requiring future attention in research and clinical practice.

Living with dementia – My Life My Goals Workbook

Image source: Emily Ong

DAI is pleased to announce a recent Alzheimer’s Society UK publication called Living with Dementia: My Life, My Goals. DAI board member Emily Ong from Singapore was one of the team of people living with dementia who collaborated on it.

DAI is proud of the work Emily is doing locally, and globally for all people with dementia.  Thank you Emily, and thanks also to all of the contributors to this important workbook.

Living with Dementia: My Life, My Goals

There is hope that you can live well. A practical guide full of hope to help you set your goals.

 

 

 

DONATE TO OR PARTNER WITH DAI

10 Guiding Principles for movement training in degenerative neurological conditions

Get ready, get set, GO… Register now for the next DAI Webinar!

10 Guiding principles for movement training in degenerative neurological conditions

Speaker: Professor James McLoughlin, BAppSc(Physio),MSc(Clinical Neuroscience), PhD

Please note, the login details will be sent to you 2 HOURS before the event starts.

DAY/DATE(S):

  • Wednesday, October 27, 2021 (USA/CA/UK/EU) – 4:00 pm CDT
  • Thursday, October 28, 2021 (AU/NZ/ASIA) – 8:00 am AEDT
  • Reminder: this is one event, set in a number of different time zones – it is not being held twice.

About the Webinar: Categorising the many active ingredients that can be included in a physical rehabilitation program remains a huge challenge for health professionals and researchers. The 10 guiding principles aim to provide a common language to help everyone – most of all the people engaged in rehabilitation! James will outline 10 important principles which should be considered when planning a rehabilitation program in those with degenerative neurological conditions.

About our speaker: James is director of Advanced Neuro Rehab in Adelaide South Australia where he works clinically as neurological physiotherapist. James is also part-time Associate Professor at Flinders University working as teaching specialist in Neurological Physiotherapy. James has an interest in movement recovery and rehabilitation with people with all neurological conditions, in addition to those with balance/dizziness.

Wednesday, 27 Oct 2021

  • 2:00 pm Pacific PDT
  • 3:00 pm Mountain, MDT
  • 3:00 pm Mountain, MDT
  • 4:00 pm Central, CDT
  • 5:00 pm Eastern, EDT
  • 10:00 pm UK, BST
  • 11:00 pm Johannesburg, SAST

Thursday, 28 Oct 2021

  • 5:00 am Singapore SGT/Perth AWST
  • 7:00 am Brisbane, AEST
  • 7:30 am Adelaide, ACDT
  • 8:00 am, Sydney/Melbourne, AEDT
  • 10:00 am Auckland, NZDT

The Webinar runs for up to 1.5 hours.

Please check here if your time is not listed above.

COST TO ATTEND:

  • DAI Members: FREE
  • Care partners of people with dementia: FREE
  • Researchers: FREE
  • Health Care Professionals: FREE
  • Others: FREE
  • DONATION: $30.00

WHILST WE HAVE MADE IT FREE FOR YOU TO ATTEND, PLEASE CONSIDER MAKING A DONATION TO SUPPORT THESE EVENTS AND SERVICES FOR OUR MEMBERS.

Support people with dementia:

THANK YOU

Nothing about us without us

We are pleased to share this reflection on the important messages we have heard during the 2021 World Alzheimer’s Month / Dementia Awareness Month, written by DAI board member, Julie Hayden from the UK.
Thank you Julie.
As we reflect on Dementia Awareness Month 2021, lets not forget the important messages we have received from each nation and the numerous organisations which have taken part.
Those messages include:
  • Dementia can affect anyone from any age bracket, cultural background or social standing. Few people living with dementia today ever thought it would come to them. Please consider how you would wish to be treated.
  • To be Dementia Friendly is fine, but being Dementia Inclusive is better. Involving us in all aspects of life, so affording us the same Rights that are enjoyed by others.
  • Showing love, respect and consideration whatever our level of dementia and however challenging our symptoms may be to you. We remain whole persons. We do not fade away or disappear, we just often become harder to reach, but it’s always worth the effort of doing so.
  • At the centre of all plans for us and discussions about us, please remember it is vital that we are part of that dialogue.
Let’s continue to work together.
So much more can be achieved if we develop a team approach.
No one organisation can do it alone and no piece of work has value unless it stems from the lived experience of people who themselves are diagnosed wth dementia.

View our Webinar “Living Life to the full”

Watch our recent webinar, the fist of four focused on rehabilitaiton for people with dementia,  Living Life to the full, by Associate Professor Michele Callisaya and Dr Morag Taylor.

Associate Professor Michele Callisaya and Dr Morag Taylor recently presented to our members and audience a webinar titled, “Rehabilitation to maintain physical function”. Along with thinking and memory, physical function is often compromised in people with dementia. Physical functions include balance, strength and the ability to walk well. Good physical function is important for maintaining everyday activities, whereas poor physical function increases the risk of falls. This presentation outlined the common physical disabilities found in people living with dementia, how thinking and memory influence the ability to walk safely, as well as evidence for treatments to maintain or improve physical function and prevent falls.

Donate

World Alzheimers Month DAI Webinar Series

World Alzheimer’s Month 2021 #WAM2021,  also known in some countries as Dementia Awareness Month #DAM or Dementia Action Week #DAW is almost here!

Lets’s all work together to make a difference.
#Collaborate #Cooperate #WorkingTogether

This year DAI has planned a series of webinars specifically focused on rehabilitation for dementia. We have done this, as people with dementia have been campaigning for the full suite of rehabilitative interventions for decades, and at last, we appear to be seeing small actions towards actually achieving this.

Last year, Professor Lee-Fay Low and A/Professor Kate Laver edited a book on Rehabilitaiton for Dementia. This year, the World Health Organisation has been working on their own Rehabilitation for Dementia Guidelines, so there is hope it will eventually make it into mainstream clinical and care practice.

Rehabilitation and Dementia #DAI Webinar Series 2021

  1. Webinar 1: Rehabilitation to maintain physical function, presented by A/Prof Michele Callisaya and Dr Morag Taylor
  2. Webinar 2: Living life to the full: rehabilitation of daily activities and leisure for people with dementia, presented by Associate Professor Kate Laver and Doctor Claire O’Connor
  3. Webinar 3: Cognition-oriented treatments for people with dementia, presented by Dr Alex Bahar-Fuchs and Dr Loren Mowszowski
  4. Webinar 4 Panel Session: The Importance of Rehabilitation for all People with Dementia, with panellists includng Professor Lee-Fay Low, PhD, Emily Ong, Lynette Rogers and Kate Swaffer

Rehabilitation for all people with dementia is a basic human right, and in this series, DAI aims to highlight why.

REMINDER

Reminder to register for the two webinars this coming week too, both very important sessions exploring new ways of managing dementia.

  1. How to make Alzheimer’s a rare Disease!, by Professor Dale Bredesen, M.D.
  2. Updates In Precision Medicine and Protocols for MCI & Dementia, by Dr Nate Bergman DO, MBA

Dementia and Rehabilitation by Emily Tan Tan Ong

We are pleased to publish the following article written by DAI member Emily Tan Tan Ong on Dementia and Rehabilitation, or rather, the lack of rehabilitation for people with dementia.

Emily mentions in her article that rehabilitation for dementia is not heard of in her country; most other DAI members also report it is unheard of in their countries.

As our CEO Kate Swaffer says: “If we are afforded rehabilitation after a stroke or other brain injury or medical condition, then we have the same right to be after a diagnosis of dementia. It won’t be a cure, and may not even slow the progression, but rehabilition does improve quality of life.”

I keep the patients alive. Rehabilitation gives them Quality of Life. 

(Dr. Tagio Tumas, Ministry of Health, WHO Rehabilitation 2030 Forum, Geneva, July 2019).

Dementia and Rehabilitation, by Emily Tan Tan Ong

With no means to significantly modify the progression of dementia and no cure in the foreseeable future, the rehabilitation approach is an integral part of living positively with dementia.

Rehabilitation, in its essence, is a set of interventions needed when a person is experiencing limitations in everyday physical, mental, and social functioning due to aging or a health condition, including chronic diseases or disorders, injuries, or trauma [1]. It is estimated that at least 1 in 3 people in the world are living with a health condition that would benefit from rehabilitation [2].

Despite this, rehabilitation has not been prioritized and is under-resourced globally.

A possible explanation could be rehabilitation is often perceived as an expensive and specialized service provided at the secondary care level and needed by those recovering from injury or stroke. Hence, the perception that rehabilitation is a luxury health service in addition to primary health care has caused it to be undervalued and ignored when competing demands for resources and investments.

As a result, people living with terminal, progressive health conditions like dementia, which require long-term rehabilitation services, are left behind when rehabilitation is not part of or accessible at the primary health care level.

Earlier on in my journey living with dementia, I was having difficulties with some of the everyday functioning. I was confused at the public transport interchange, overwhelmed with sequential tasks like cooking and baking, and not able to remember the content of the paragraph I just read.

It is like saying, “Sorry too bad you are diagnosed with dementia but there is nothing we can help you to continue living other than attending Adult Day Care Center or Memories Cafe.  One is told that is the way life is going to be, living with dementia, losing one’s functional and cognitive abilities, and independence.

Hence, it is not surprising many newly diagnosed with young-onset dementia go into depression. It is emotionally tormenting to be alive and not able to do things when you still have insights into who you are, what you value, and how you want to live despite dementia.

Rehabilitation in dementia is unheard of in this part of the world where I live.

The” ESTEEM” cognitive rehabilitation program, a partnership between the National Neuro Institute and the Singapore Alzheimer Disease Association is available to individuals diagnosed with moderate young-onset dementia. Hence, I was left unsupported to cope with my cognitive impairment when Cognitive Rehabilitation (CR) interventions would have helped to ease in transitioning my life to the ‘new normal’ with dementia in a more positive and encouraging light.

I came across the GREAT Cognitive Rehabilitation project of Professor Linda Clare from the University of Exeter when looking for ways to self-help myself.

The program uses a goal-oriented approach to enable people living with mild to moderate dementia to “function optimally in the context of their intrinsic capacity and current health state” [3].

However, the GREAT project is delivered by trained therapists who then work together with each individual to formulate meaningful and intrinsically motivated goals that are realistic and potentially achievable. The drawback is that not everyone can access trained cognitive rehabilitation therapists.

The training materials available are for therapists specializing in cognitive rehabilitation. The content was wordy and conceptual, but I am determined to translate whatever information I could obtain into a self-help Cognitive Rehabilitation strategy. I took ages to read, comprehend the principles, and come out with ways to maintain or regain, or in some cases, compensate for my declining functional ability. It was the best thing I have done to sustain my independence and continue living the life I want. Three years down the road with dementia, I still cook, bake, and enjoy reading. I found that the Cognitive Rehabilitation strategies have enabled me to become stronger in areas I didn’t even consider would be possible. I learned to make bread at home, I regained my ability to use a laptop, and more apt at making Powerpoint slides. The best of all, I conquered my inadequacy and incompetency in writing. I now love to write for my blog.

I want to appeal to policymakers to acknowledge the rights of people living with dementia to rehabilitation services and make it part of the primary healthcare system. It is without a doubt that creating an accessible, dementia-friendly neighborhood help to remove external barriers to participation it is even more crucial to enable people living with dementia to participate in everyday life in a manner that is meaningful and purposeful to them. In this way, it also helps to dispel the public perception of incapacity in dementia.

References:

[1] Cieza A. Rehabilitation the health strategy of the 21st century. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2019; 100: 2212-2214

[2] Cieza A. et al.. Global estimates of the need for rehabilitation based on the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. Lancet. 2020; 396: 2006-2017

[3] Clare L (2017) Rehabilitation for people living with dementia: A practical framework of positive support. PLoS Med 14(3): e1002245. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002245

Ps. Don’t forget to register for our next “Meeting Of The Minds” Webinar, Disrupted! Resiliently Reintegrating After Stress & Adversity by Dr Kozhi Sidney Makai.

Assoc. Professor James McLoughlin presents here on rehabilitation and dementia at a DAI Webinar hosted in 2016. It is still a hard sell!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Health Day 2021

World Health Organisation – World Health Day 2021

On April 7 each year, DAI joins the world in observing World Health Day. The theme in 2021 is Building a fairer, healthier world.

We must end discrimination and exclusion.

As COVID-19 has highlighted, some people live healthier lives with better access to health services than other people. These differences are entirely due to the conditions in which they are born, grow, live, work, and age. However, they can also be due to stigma, discrimination, economic status, and other factors such as disability or a disease, such as dementia.

All over the world, people struggle financially, which the pandemic has exacerbated. Some groups struggle with little or no daily income, inadequate housing conditions, poor educational and employment opportunities, gender inequality, age and disability discrimination. They also have little to no access to clean water and air, nutritious food, or health services.

This harms our societies and economies, leading to unnecessary distress, avoidable illnesses, and premature death.

DAI represents the more than 50 million people currently living with dementia. Nearly 60% live in low and middle income countries.

COVID-19 has affected all countries hard, but its impact has been harshest on those communities that were already vulnerable, especially people living with dementia and other disabilities.

Everyone impacted by dementia receives little if any health care. This includes lack of diagnostic support and inadequate support for living with dementia once diagnosed, with interventions such as rehabilitation.

From increased isolation to systemic human and disability rights violations, people with dementia have disproportionately experienced the adverse effects of measures implemented to contain the pandemic.

This is where DAI comes in…

During the pandemic, DAI increased the number of freely available services for people living with dementia by providing even more free, online support groups and other activities for our members in 49 countries. DAI has also continued our global efforts on claiming the human and disability rights for all people with dementia through our international advocacy and policy work.

In recognition of World Health Day, Dementia Alliance International commits to continuing to build a fairer, healthier world.

We will continue to call on leaders to monitor inequalities experienced by people with dementia and our families, and will work towards ensuring that all are able to access quality health services.

As a registered non-profit charity, we rely on the support of people like you. Your donation will help us to provide free online peer to peer support groups for people living with dementia, virtual cafes, and educational webinars, as well as other opportunities for families, care partners, and the wider dementia community.

DAI’s vision is a world where all people are valued and included.

If you do too, please consider becoming a regular supporter of Dementia Alliance International.

Every dollar makes a difference in the life of someone living with a diagnosis of dementia!

We are appealing to you to donate to DAI today.

Thank you.

 

You are invited to DAI’s 7th birthday Cafe

You are invited to the January 2021 virtual DAI Cafe Le Brain to help us celebrate 7 years of DAI’s advocacy and progress.

DAI Celebrates 7 Years

Hosts: Christine Thelker, Wally Cox and Kate Swaffer

Speakers include: Mr John Sandblom, Co founder and Treasurer, Dementia Alliance International, Mr Glenn Rees, Chair, Alzheimers Disease International and Ms Bethany Browne, Human Rights Advisor, International Disability Alliance.

Everyone is welcome.

DAI members will receive the zoom link to join by email.
All others will need to register here please.

DAY/DATE(S):

  • Tuesday, January 26, 2021 (USA/CA/UK/EU)
  • Wednesday, January 27, 2021 (AU/NZ/Asia)
  • Please note this is one event, set in a number of different time zones.

About the Cafe: Every month, DAI hosts a virtual café for its members and their families and supporters, and we have been doing so now for over 7 years!

Each January, we take this opportunity to celebrate our birthday together, and we invite you to join us. From small and humble dreams of global advocacy and human rights, and now, for dementia to be managed as a disability, alongside providing weekly peer to peer support and brain health sessions, we have achieved a lot!

This is your opportunity to hear from others who will share where we have been, acknowledging the work we have done, and dreaming together for our future. Our vision is for all people to be valued and equally included, including people with dementia and our care partners.

Everyone is welcome.

DAI members will receive the zoom link to join by email.
All others will need to register here please.

Programme:

  • Introductions and welcome by Kate Swaffer
  • Graeme Atkins performs, Happy 7th birthday DAI
  • Introducing our new Chair, Alister Robertson from New Zealand
  • Board update, Alister Robertson
  • DAI ‘(W)re-creational Officer, Graeme Atkins performs the DAI 7th birthday song, written by him
  • DAI’s global advocacy, and the value of our collaboration with ADI, by Glenn Rees
  • The importance of human rights and the CRPD for people with dementia, by Bethany Browne
  • An overview of the last 7 years (with images), hosted by Christine, Kate and Wally; you will hear from others including co founder Amy Shives and our long term volunteer Sarah Yeates

We will hear from a number of members and guests, inluding some of our co founders, volunteers and other special guests, including:

Mr John Sandblom, who is a co-founder of Dementia Alliance International (DAI), board member and the current Treasurer, and was instrumental in helping to set up DAI.

Mr Glenn Rees, who is the outgoing Chair of Alzheimer’s Disease International, and a former Chief Executive Office of Dementia Australia.

Ms Bethany Browne, who is the Human Rights Advisor to the International Disability Alliance, and formely worked for Human Rights Watch, including writing two reports on the excessive use of chemical restraint in nursing homes in the US and Australia.

Everyone is welcome.

DAI members will receive the zoom link to join by email.
All others will need to register here please.

DAY/DATE(S):

Tuesday, January 26, 2021 (USA/CA/UK/EU):

  • 1:00 pm Pacific
  • 2:00 pm Mountain
  • 3:00 pm Central
  • 4:00 pm Eastern
  • 9:00 pm London/Glasgow/Dublin UK
  • 10:00 pm Paris, Munich, Amsterdam, EU

Wednesday, January 26, 2021 ( AU/NZ/ASIA):

  • 5:00 am Perth, AU/Taipei/Singapore
  • 7:00 am Brisbane, AU
  • 7:30 am Adelaide, AU
  • 8:00 am Sydney/Melbourne/Canberra/Tasmania/Brisbane, AU
  • 10:00 am Auckland, NZ

The Webinar runs for up to 1.5 hours.

Check your time here if not listed above.

COST TO ATTEND:

  • FREE
  • YOUR DONATIONS ARE GREATLY APPRECIATED

PLEASE DONATE TO DAI OR BECOME AN ASSOCIATE OR PARTNER WITH US. WITHOUT YOU, DAI COULD NOT PROVIDE THE SERVICES WE PROVIDE CURRENTLY FOR MEMBERS, THEIR FAMILIES & OUR GLOBAL FAMILY.

Support people with dementia:

Everyone is welcome.

DAI members will receive the zoom link to join by email.
All others will need to register here please.

THANK YOU