All posts by DementiaAlliance

Join us soon for our 5th Birthday Party

Please join us for DAI’s special 5th birthday celebration, which starts soon.  

We are really looking forward to sharing this special event with everyone; DAI members, our family, friends, supporters and professionals.

Today we will show vignettes of our founders speaking at events or conferences and share cake and coffee (or champagne) virtually. It may seem a little excessive to have sent out another blog about our birthday today, especially as we sent a recent newsletter, but many members of DAI really are very excited!

  • Tuesday January 15, 2019 (USA/CA/EU)
  • Wednesday January 16, 2019 (AU/NZ/CHN/TWN)

Join the online celebration here: https://zoom.us/j/476273211
For your exact time to join us, please scroll down.

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has. (Margaret Mead)

I suspect many people (including some the founders!) doubted we could do it in the early days, and we are sure that without dreams, and perseverance, and most iportantly, working together, we have made it!

Five years is a major milestone, and we want to share it with you all; without everyone, not just our members, DAI would not be where it is today! Thank you.

PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS ONE EVENT, SET IN MANY TIME ZONES

Tuesday, January 15, 2019 (USA/UK/EU/CA):
11:00 am  HST Honolulu
1:00 pm    PST Oregon Portland/San Francisco USA
1:00 pm    PST Vancouver CA
3:00 pm    CST Des Moines/Chicago USA
4:00 pm    EST New York USA
4:00 pm    EST Toronto CA
9:00 pm    GMT London/Glasgow UK
10:00 pm CET Paris, Munich, Amsterdam, EU

Wednesday, January 16, 2019 (AU/NZ/JP/IND/TWN):
5:00 am    CST Beijing, China
7:30 am    ACDT Adelaide AU
7:00 am    AEST Brisbane AU
8:00 am    AEDT Sydney/Melbourne/Canberra/Tasmania AU
5:00 am    AWST Perth AU/Taipei TWN
6:00 am    JST Tokyo, JP
10:00 am NZDT Auckland, NZ

The celebration runs for up to 2 hours. Check your time if not listed above. 

If you can’t join using zoom, join via:

One tap mobile
+16699006833,,476273211# US (San Jose)
+16468769923,,476273211# US (New York)
Dial by your location
+1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
+1 646 876 9923 US (New York)

Meeting ID: 476 273 211

Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/adK37bjU6o

Rehabilitation for dementia: evidence and opportunities

For those of you who missed our latest Webinar presented by Associate Professor Lee-Fay Low, Rehabilitation for dementia: evidence and opportunities, it is now available to view here and on our YouTube channel. Thanks again to Lee-Fay for her continued support for DAI.

About the Webinar: The World Health Organisation has defined rehabilitation as “a set of measures that assist individuals, who experience or are likely to experience disability, to achieve and maintain optimum functioning in interaction with their environments”. Research and practice relating to dementia is predominantly focused on prevention, disease-modifying treatment, and care. This presentation will review the current evidence for rehabilitation strategies (e.g. exercise, cognitive training, occupational therapy) in dementia, and outline several ongoing studies. Barriers to rehabilitation for dementia will also be presented.

About A/Professor Low: Lee-Fay Low (BSc Psych (Hons), PhD) is Associate Professor in Ageing and Health, NHMRC Boosting Dementia Research Leadership Development Fellow, and Head of Behavioural and Social Sciences in Health in the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney. She is a registered psychologist with a PhD in psychiatric epidemiology.

A/Prof Low conducts research that she hopes will make a difference in the world.

Her main areas of expertise are in home and residential care for older people, wellbeing in people with dementia, dementia risk factors for dementia, dementia literacy, and people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. She is particularly interested in developing and evaluating interventions to improve the quality of life of older people. She has methodological skills in population studies, systematic reviews, clustered randomised trials, instrument development and evaluation, and translation of research into practice.

She has authored over 100 peer-reviewed articles, as well as two books on dementia. She is an active advocate in improving how older people are treated and cared for. Lee-Fay thinks that research is great fun, and even admits to liking statistics.

Watch the presentation below, and download the slides here…

Happy New Year & Happy 5th Birthday DAI

Today is January 1, 2019! It  is not only New Years Day, it is the celebration of the 5th Birthday of Dementia Alliance International!

We therefore also wish everyone a safe and peaceful New Year, as well as a meaningful and productive year ahead, and really hope you will join us for our 5th Birthday Celebration and Webinar later this month.

The eight founding members who set up DAI, decided the organization  should be a global advocacy and support group, of, by and for people with dementia. The original Vision was for “A World where people with dementia are valued.”

DAI’s Vision now is: “A world where people with dementia are valued and included” and we are proud to also be global, well beyond the three countries the original co founders are from.

Although there were and still are many Alzheimer’s organisations, their missions started with support for families and care partners, and the founding members of DAI believed that peer to peer support specifically of, by and for people with dementia was needed. The eight founding members also noticed that too often, people spoke for us and about us, but rarely invited us to speak for ourselves. The first few years that people with dementia spoke at ADI conferences, they usually had to submit abstracts and pay to attend.

It is very likely most of the founding members did not have the goal or vision for the amount or level of global advoacy and activism DAI has become involved in, nor any sense of who we would be collaborating or in relationships and partnerships with, but in five years, we have worked hard, and collaborated to work with many leading organisations including the United Nations and the World Health Organisation.

Yesterday was the last official day of active service as members of the Board of Directors for Phyllis Fehr, Ian Gladstone, and Agnes Houston, and we thank them sincerely for their service. Our incoming 2019 Board of Directors will meet next week for their first official board meeting, and we will more formally introduce you to them board soon. By attending our birthday party or our January Webinar, you will also get to meet them online.

Our official celebration of our 5th Birthday will be held on January 15/16, 2019. DAI Members will be sent the login details separately and everyone else will be receive registration details to attend soon.

DAI’s January “A Meeting Of The Minds” January Webinar: “5 years on: Why DAI? Where have we been? Where are we going?” will be held on January 30/31, 2019. The presenters are DAI’s Chair & CEO Kate Swaffer and Treasurer John Sandblom, two of the original co founders. You can read about it and register for it here…

Check out our 2019 Board of Directors

Kate Swaffer (Chair/CEO)
Jerry Wylie (Vice Chair)
Eileen Taylor (Secretary)
John Sandblom (Treasurer)
James McKillop
Maria Turner
Alister Robertson
Christine Thelker
Michael Belleville
Bill Turner (Image not available)
Howard Gordon
Carole Mulliken

Seasons Greetings

We wish everyone a safe and restful festive season, and a very happy and productive 2019. Thanks also for your support.

As we reflect on 2018, it is remarkable to think that at the end of this year, Dementia Alliance International (DAI) will be celebrating its fifth birthday.

From those early days of eight (8) founding members with dementia representing three countries, we have come a long way.  Most of all, we hope that our members gain strength and are empowered to live with a higher quality of life than they are told to expect, from knowing and meeting others also living with dementia.

For some members, DAI becomes a life long commitment and provider of support. For others it could be seen as a launch pad; one that helps them go back to living more positively with dementia. DAI is very proud of what we started, and what we continue to do, and sometimes in spite of varying difficult challenges and hurdles.

One of our mottos has always been, “onwards and upwards, in spite of the every increasing fog”, and we work to keep our vision, mission and values in sight, so that the hurdles of dementia don’t stop us from our work.

DAI was first set up as an advocacy and support group of, by and for people with dementia, to give us an authentic voice, and with the vision of “A world where people with dementia are valued and included.”.  

That is the uniqueness of DAI, as we do not have organisations or people without dementia telling us what to say or what to do. We are an autonomous group, with an autonomous voice, and although it can be difficult some days even to get dressed, together we are stronger. We can and we do achieve a lot, often with the direct support of each other, and by using a lot of low and high tech disability support.

In 2018, we have had a lot of new members join DAI, and there has been much activity locally, regionally, national and globally by members. We work collaboratively with national Alzheimer’s organisations as well as the emerging number of National and Regional Dementia Working Groups as requested. 

DAI is very proud to have recently partnered with Dementia Australia (DA), which you can read more about in our Media Release. They are the first national advocacy organisation in the world to have formally partnered with us. DAI is also pleased to have re partnered with Alzheimer’s Disease International, and are delighted the Taiwan Alzheimer’s Disease Association (TADA) have also given DAI a generous donation.

In 2019, we look forward to publishing our 2018 Annual Report, which will be full of the news about our many activities around the world, a number of reports, and the successes and goals we have reached this year. It will include the details of our recent Annual General Meeting.

We congratulate Dr Jennifer Bute on the recent release of her first book, Dementia from the Inside: A doctor’s personal journey of hope, available now. Wendy Mitchells book, first published in the UK earlier this year Somebody I Used to Know continues to inspire, and has now also been published into Japanese and Spanish. Congratulations Wendy. Many others with dementia have published books about their own experiences of dementia, and many of these authors, and others living with dementia continue to write regular blogs. 

DAI also congratulates Sarah Yeates, our long time and very loyal volunter, who works full time for Caladenia Dementia Care. Sarah has just been made their Chief Executive Officer, a very well deserved recognition of her ongoing committment and excellence.

Peter Berry and Lorayne Burgess from the UK (possibly other DAI members too) have been involved in a BBC documentary, based on proving to the world people with dementia are still employable. We congratulate them on this; as they have strenghened friendships, they have also helped changed attitudes about dementia. We also congratulate Mrs Helen Rochford-Brennan on her appointment as the new Chair of the European Working Group of people With Dementia, and on receiving her Honorary Doctorate from the NUI Galway.

DAI continues to make submissions to governments on our rights, on dementia plans,  on access to the CRPD, and on other matters, as they come up. The LEAD Coalition also makes reggular submissions, which DAI regularly co-signs to help strengthen their voice for change in the USA. The Older Persons Convention is still under review, and we are also working towards ensuring it is aligned to the CRPD, and in which we hope the final draft will reflect this as well as highlight dementia in its own right, as it deserves.

We are very proud to be Founding Members of the newly established Global Rehabilitation Alliance, which was launched in Geneva at the World Health Assembly this year. DAI is now also a formal member of the The Global Alliance for the Rights of Older People, who works with agencies seeking to promote and strengthen the rights of older people. 

The emergence of Dementia Working or Advisory Groups or Committees continues to strengthen; this is a list of the known Groups/Committees:

  • 2000: Dementia Advocacy Support Network International (DASNI)
  • 2002: Scottish Dementia Working Group (SDWG)
  • 2006: Alzheimer’s America Early-Stage Advisory Group (EAG)
  • 2012: Highlands Dementia Working Group (HDWG)
  • 2012: European People with Dementia Working Group (EUPDWG)
  • 2013: Dementia Australia Dementia Advisory Committee (DADAC)
  • 2013: Irish Dementia Working Group (IDWG)
  • 2014: Dementia Alliance International (DAI)
  • 2014: Japan Dementia Working Group (JDWG)
  • 2014: Southern (Kiama) Dementia Advisory Group  (DAG’s)
  • 2014: NZ Dementia Advisory Committee (NZDAC)
  • 2015: Ontario Dementia Advisory Group (ODAG)
  • 2016: Dementia Advocacy Awareness Team (DAAT)
  • 2017: 3 Nations Dementia Working Group (3NDWG)

It is also important to note countries including Taiwan and Singapore are working towards launching their own DWG’s in 2019, and there is a continuing emergence of self-advocates in countries like this primarily due to the work of DAI and also ADI members, now determined to empower and enable the inclusion of people with dementia in their own countries.

Finally, we thank everyone who has sponsored us, or donated to us, as without your generosity, we could not continue to provide the current and new services we provide to our members.

There are only 15 days left to make Christmas REALLY COUNT, through the PayPal fee-free + 1% Christmas Donation deal. 

 

 

 

 

Universal Health Care Day 2018

Yesterday was Universal Health Care Day. This years’s theme is ‘Unite for Universal Health Coverage: Now is the Time for Collective Action’, emphasises the critical importance of strong health systems to reduce poverty, promote economic growth and achieve the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. 

It also seemed appropriate today to post this very short video from the World Health Organisation as a reminder that access to health for all is a basic human right. 

The NCD Alliance also published their updated policy brief, “on the mutually reinforcing agenda of Universal Health Coverage and NCDs, to mark UHC Day 2018. The brief on reflects the developments in both the NCD response and UHC agenda since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the SDGs. It makes the case for including NCDs in national UHC benefit packages in order to fully achieve the Sustainable Development Goal target of healthy lives and well-being for all at all ages. 2018 is the first year that UHC Day has been formally recognised by the United Nations, and comes 10 months before the UN High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage, scheduled for the 2019 General Assembly, on 23 September.”

Make Christmas REALLY Count

PayPal is once again offering charities a ‘fee-free’ special Christmas period, from November 27 through to December 31st (US time),  by covering the fees of all donations through PayPal using the link provided below.  On top of that, the Giving Fund will add 1% to the donation.

Here is the customized link https://www.paypal.com/fundraiser/charity/146240

Dementia Alliance International relies on the generosity of indovidual donors and corporate partners, and also recieves fees through the generosity of some of its members who provides offered  services, for which the fee goes to DAI.

DONATE VIA PAYPAL TODAY

https://www.paypal.com/donate/?token=PcqRwLcxINX_RU49RDuXMW8eVtJTtSBI6yzsaF1aCF5zci0eCIS39iVl2LMxcS70QwrMuG&country.x=US&locale.x=US

BECOME A DAI ASSOCIATE TODAY

https://www.dementiaallianceinternational.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/OPPORTUNITIES-FOR-RESEARCHERS-PARTNERS-SPONSORS-AND-ASSOCIATES-2.pdf

BECOME A DAI SPONSOR OR PARTNER TODAY

https://www.dementiaallianceinternational.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/OPPORTUNITIES-FOR-RESEARCHERS-PARTNERS-SPONSORS-AND-ASSOCIATES-2.pdf

READ OUR DONOR/ASSOCIATE/SPONSOR CHARTER

https://www.dementiaallianceinternational.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/SPONSOR-DONOR-AND-BEQUEST-CHARTER-2.pdf

International Day of Persons with Disabilities 2018

The World Health Organisation states Dementia is one of the major causes of disability and dependency among older people worldwide” ( 2018).

It also now defines dementia is a condition causing acquired cognitive disabilities.

It is therefore important as an organisation, DAI acknowledges and celebrates this day, as our members, when first diagnosed (even if not visible in the earlier stages of dementia) are living with acquired cognitive disabilities.  However, as dementia progresses, our disabilities are likely to become more obvious, athough this seems to be the lens through which dementia is still only being viewed by health care professionals (in spite of initiatives to diagnose earlier) and many in the community (i.e. late stage).

Seeing dementia through the lens of disability helps us to claim our rights, under the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

If you go to the United Nations website, you can read more about the theme of their activiteis today.  What is very relevant to people with dementia is they are focusing in the morning on Sustainable Development Goals, and in the afternoon on Accessible Cities for All: Smart and Inclusive Urban Planning.

This is relevant, in light of the global campaigns to make our communities ‘dementia friendly’, as what we want has little to do with being friendly, and everything to do with inclusion, and therefore access, including access to adequate health care, and disability support including rehabilitation (cognitive and physical).

On the second half of the page about today on the UN, it says:

“In the morning, the commemoration of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities will feature the launch of the first UN Flagship Report on Disability and Development on the “Realization of the Sustainable Development Goals by, for and with persons with disabilities”The publication will be launched by Mr. Elliott Harris, Assistant Secretary-General, for Economic Development and Chief Economist (UN DESA).

The opening ceremony will review the progress achieved, explore ways to further empower persons with disabilities and provide an overview of the international framework of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for SDGs, in line with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The event will gather Member States, UN entities, civil society organizations, academic institutes and persons with disabilities.

In the afternoon, the commemoration will focus on “Accessible Cities for All: Smart and Inclusive Urban Planning” as key elements to reduce inequalities and empower people to live in accessible, usable and friendly healthy environments. The event will explore SDG11 of the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development by providing space for Mayors, City Leaders to exchange innovative solutions on how to implement the SDGs and to exchange good practices about inclusive urban planning to promote the participation and well-being of their citizens of all ages and abilities.

Afterwards, the event will discuss smart inclusive environment and how to apply information and communication technologies to provide better infrastructure, quality services in a safe accessible environment.”

People with dementia have definitely become empowered, and are working together locally, nationally and globally to ensure dementia is ot only listed on websites as a condition casuing disabikites, it si a condition where we wil, at the time of diagnosis, be provided with adequate disability assessment and support to maintain independence for as long as possible, not just assessment of our Actvities of Daily Living (ADL’s), and which will also include rehabilitation.

Media Release

November 28/29, 2018

Dementia Australia and Dementia Alliance International to globally champion rights of people living with dementia. Dementia Australia has formalised its relationship with Dementia Alliance International and today signed a new memorandum of understanding (MOU).

Dementia Australia CEO, Maree McCabe said the MOU recognises both organisations are aligned in their purpose to promote awareness and understanding of dementia and to advocate for the autonomy, independence and human rights of people living with dementia.

“We share a commitment and vision for a world where people living with dementia are valued, included and receive the care and support they choose,” Ms McCabe said.

Dementia Alliance International Chair, CEO and Co-founder, Kate Swaffer said the organisations would advocate together to expand the awareness and understanding of dementia across the aged care, disability and health care sectors in Australia and on the world stage.

“Together we will liaise on global dementia policy issues, to ensure our policies and programs are aligned to the WHO Global Dementia Action Plan” Ms Swaffer said.

Dementia Alliance International is the peak organisation with membership exclusively for people with a medically confirmed diagnosis of any type of dementia from all around the world.

“As the global voice of dementia, Dementia Alliance International provides a platform for the many people living with dementia who are capable of representing themselves, or speaking up for those who are no longer able to,” Ms Swaffer said.

“We have members in 48 countries, and self-advocacy is becoming a strong focus, where we work with members of Alzheimer’s Disease International, such as Dementia Australia, to empower others to have a voice.”

Worldwide it is estimated there are 50 million people living with dementia. This number will almost double every 20 years, reaching 131.5 million in 2050.

“According to Alzheimer’s Disease International research, someone in the world develops dementia every three seconds,” Ms Swaffer said.

Dementia Australia is the national peak body and charity for people of all ages, living with all forms of dementia, their families and carers. Dementia Alliance International is the global peak body representing people with dementia.

“Dementia Australia is the first national dementia association to partner with us, and DAI is very proud to be more formally working with them,”Ms Swaffer said.

“It is a natural fit for the two peak bodies to work together to promote awareness and understanding of dementia,” Ms McCabe said.

For further information visit the Dementia Australia website at www.dementia.org.au or Dementia Alliance International at https://www.infodai.org.

Dementia Australia is the national peak body and charity for people, of all ages, living with all forms of dementia, their families and care partners. It provides advocacy, support services, education and information. An estimated 436,000 people have dementia in Australia. This number is projected to reach almost 1.1 million by 2058. Dementia Australia’s services are supported by the Australian Government. www.dementia.org.au

Dementia Alliance International(DAI) is a collaboration of individuals diagnosed with dementia providing a unified voice of strength, advocacy, and support in the fight for individual autonomy for people with dementia. The aim is to bring the community composed of those with dementia together as one strong voice to urge the government, private sector, and medical professionals to listen to our concerns and take action to address this urgent global crisis. It is our firm belief that working together, we will identify concrete action for implementation with the international community, and in the process, ensure our human rights are being fully met. DAI is a registered charity in the USA, and the global voice of dementiahttps://www.infodai.org

Dementia is a Global and National Health Priority Area 

Media contacts: Louise Handran [email protected] +61 490 128 304 / Kate Swaffer [email protected]

When talking or writing about dementia please refer to Dementia Language Guidelines.

Image: Ms Maree McCabe, CEO, Dementia Australia and Ms Kate Swaffer, CEO, Dementia Alliance International, signing the Memorandum Of Understanding (MOU)

 

Support Dementia Alliance International

Volunteer at Dementia Alliance International

“Working and supporting people with dementia as a student” by Jeremy Raynolds

Jeremy Raynolds. Image source: Jeremy RaynoldsIn the last 5-10 years, there has been a lot of interest and work in supporting intergenerational relationships and care for people living in aged care facilities (nursing homes), with and without dementia.

This week, we are pleased to feature a guest blog written by Jeremy Raynolds, who is a third-year psychology student at Washington State.

Jeremy has a strong interest in gerontology studies and often volunteers in nursing homes and care centers. He occasionally blogs about his work and experiences, and gets the help with writing from edubirdie. His aim is to develop a strategy accessible to anyone who has people with dementia in their care. We thank Jeremy for writing this guest blog, and for his interest in gerontology, and particularly in positively supporting people diagnosed with dementia.

Working and supporting people with dementia as a student

By Jeremy  Raynolds © 2018

“Gerontology is derived from the Greek words geron, “old man” and -logia, “study of”and, as you can guess is the study of the variety of aspects of getting older.

Aging is a natural process that affects everyone, but, of course, every case is unique. In this article, we will touch upon a very specific topic – caring for people with dementia, the type of brain disease that affects thinking abilities, memory capabilities and emotional stability. It is especially challenging, and requires a special approach and set of skills. Today we are focusing on advice for students who are willing to volunteer or do an internship in an Alzheimer’s care center or nursing home that deals with dementia. This is a very noble, yet difficult task that deserves praise as well as support from specialists and society.

Caring for the elderly is not an easy task. You sometimes have to deal with grumpiness, sicknesses, and various emotional and psychological issues. However, it goes without saying that caring for older patients with dementia may be harder. Pressure can build from constant repetition due to memory issues experienced by people with dementia, as well as unstable emotional backgrounds and the fears that come along with the work atmosphere at care centers. So it is extremely important to support and provide reasonable assistance to those students who decide to take up this task.

The disease also raises many social issues, as people with dementia can be isolated and treated unfairly, and the question of human rights arises from the cognitive deprivation aspects of dementia. Due to these reasons, proper care, destigmatization of the problem and acceptance are essential to the issue.

The vital characteristics of caring for people with dementia are compassion, understanding, and patience—a lot of patience.

Try to think of them as people with different processes that they need to go through and do not expect them to act like other older people. They may need more time to make a decision, more time to process some things and they may ask you the same thing repeatedly. But when you recognize where this comes from and make room for a patient and kind response, everything works out perfectly.

Supporting people with this disease can be broken down into small parts. For instance, communication is extremely important – everyone needs human touch and connection, including people who live with dementia. You can find out the topics that interest this particular person and embrace them, even though the conversation might not be as smooth and consistent as usual. But it is a true charity to set aside your frustrations and personal issues and selflessly connect with a person in need of communication.

Of course, it is important to know your limits. Do not make work your entire existence; it puts you at risk of burning out and damaging your own mental and emotional state. Take it slow and remember to take breaks and “switch off” for a while. Refresh yourself with some totally random activity or other to reprogram your mind and body. It could be a close set of exercises or a few pages from a book, a walk outside or a coffee break.

Consider this work as a partnership.

You meet the need for socializing and connection for people with dementia, and they provide you with an infinite learning opportunity.

It doesn’t matter whether you are a future social worker, a psychology student, or a medical student – practice is the best teacher. No matter how many books and theories you have gone through, practical approach grants you with precious skills and knowledge. It is a good reason to be grateful for such an opportunity.”

We have invited Jeremy, and hope he will find time next year to present on this topic at one of our Webinars.

Register now for our next “A Meeting Of The Minds” Webinar with Associate Proffessor Lee-Fay Low, “Rehabilitation for dementia: Evidence & Opportunities”

DAI has no paid staff and provides all services for memers for free. Without YOUR support, this would not be possible. Thank you.

Rehabilitation and dementia: evidence & opportunities

Our November “A Meeting Of The Minds” Webinar is by Associate Professor LeeFay Low fom Sydney University. The topic, Rehabilitation and dementia: evidence & opportunities, will be of great interest to members and professionals, and we hope you will join us.

 

 

 

 

 

About the Webinar:  The World Health Organisation has defined rehabilitation as “a set of measures that assist individuals, who experience or are likely to experience disability, to achieve and maintain optimum functioning in interaction with their environments”. Research and practice relating to dementia is predominantly focused on prevention, disease-modifying treatment, and care. This presentation will review the current evidence for rehabilitation strategies (e.g. exercise, cognitive training, occupational therapy) in dementia, and outline several ongoing studies. Barriers to rehabilitation for dementia will also be presented.

Register here…

About A/Professor Low: Lee-Fay Low (BSc Psych (Hons), PhD) is Associate Professor in Ageing and Health, NHMRC Boosting Dementia Research Leadership Development Fellow, and Head of Behavioural and Social Sciences in Health in the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney. She is a registered psychologist with a PhD in psychiatric epidemiology.

A/Prof Low conducts research that she hopes will make a difference in the world.

Her main areas of expertise are in home and residential care for older people, wellbeing in people with dementia, dementia risk factors for dementia, dementia literacy, and people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. She is particularly interested in developing and evaluating interventions to improve the quality of life of older people. She has methodological skills in population studies, systematic reviews, clustered randomised trials, instrument development and evaluation, and translation of research into practice.

She has authored over 100 peer-reviewed articles, as well as two books on dementia. She is an active advocate in improving how older people are treated and cared for. Lee-Fay thinks that research is great fun, and even admits to liking statistics.

Register here…

Wednesday, November 28, 2018 – times (USA/UK/EU/CA):

10:00 am  Honolulu
12:00 pm  Oregon Portland/San Francisco USA
12:00 pm  Vancouver CA
2:00 pm    Des Moines/Chicago USA
3:00 pm    New York USA
3:00 pm    Toronto CA
8:00 pm    London/Glasgow UK
9:00 pm    Paris, Munich, Amsterdam, EU

Thursday, November 29, 2018 – times (AU/NZ/JP/IND/TWN):

6:00 am    Adelaide AU
6:30 am    Brisbane AU
7:00 am    Sydney/Melbourne/Canberra/Tasmania AU
4:00 am    Perth AU/Taipei TWN
5:00 am    Tokyo, JP
9:00 am    Auckland, NZ

The webinar runs for 1 hour. 

Check your time if not listed above by using clicking this link… 

Register here…

 

COST TO ATTEND:

  • FREE for DAI members and their care partner (if you have dementia, please join here: www.joindai.org
  • $40 USD for all others
  • $20:00 USD Students (FT, unemployed)
  • DONATION (this is not in lieu of a paid ticket unless it is higher than the fee, if you do not fit into the FREE ticket category)

THE SMALL FEE PAID FOR SOME ATTENDEES OF THIS EVENT IS GREATLY APPRECIATED.

WEBINAR FEES AND DONATIONS ARE OUR ONLY SOURCE OF REGULAR REVENUE. WITHOUT THEM, DAI COULD NOT PROVIDE THE SERVICES WE PROVIDE CURRENTLY FOR MEMBERS, THEIR FAMILIES & THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY.

  • $US 5.00 covers the average cost of one of our monthly bank fees
  • $US 60.00 covers the average of the cost of our monthly Zoom subscription fee
  • $US 120.00 covers the average monthly cost of the MailChimp subscription
  • $US 300.00 covers the current cost of 3 months of website management fees

PLEASE DONATE HERE: https://www.dementiaallianceinternational.org/donate/

If you need a certificate of attendance, please email us at [email protected]

Note: the Q&A  session at the end of our webinars are never available publicly, and therefore will not be available after the event. Some webinars are available on our YouTube channel, but not all depending on each presenter, or the quality of the recording.